Etymology
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adapt (v.)
Origin and meaning of adapt
early 15c. (implied in adapted) "to fit (something, for some purpose)," from Old French adapter (14c.), from Latin adaptare "adjust, fit to," from ad "to" (see ad-) + aptare "to join," from aptus "fitted" (see apt). Intransitive meaning "to undergo modification so as to fit new circumstances" is from 1956. Related: Adapting.
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adaptive (adj.)
1795, from adapt + -ive. Proper formation is adaptative (1831).
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adaptable (adj.)

1680s, "capable of being made to fit by alteration," from adapt + -able.

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adapter (n.)
1801, "one who adapts (something to something else)," agent noun from adapt. From 1808 as "mechanical means of adapting objects so they fit or work together" (originally of chemistry apparatus); electrical engineering sense is by 1907.
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nativize (v.)

1933, in linguistics, "adapt (a loan-word) to the phonetic structure of the native language," from native (adj.) + -ize. Related: Nativized; nativizing.

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script (v.)

1935, "adapt (a written work) for broadcasting or film," from script (n.). Figurative sense, "following prescribed directions," is by 1977. Related: Scripted; scripting.

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modernize (v.)

"give a modern character or appearance to, cause to conform to modern ideas, adapt to modern persons," 1680s, from modern (adj.) + -ize, or from French moderniser. Related: Modernized; modernizing; modernizer (1739).

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acclimate (v.)

1792, "habituate (something) to a new climate," from French acclimater, verb formed from à "to" (see ad-) + climat (see climate). Intransitive sense "adapt to a new climate" is from 1861. Related: Acclimated; acclimating. The extended form acclimatize is now more common in the older sense of this word (generally in reference to plants or animals), leaving to this word the intransitive sense, which more often refers to humans.

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inure (v.)
formerly also enure, mid-15c., "accustom, adapt, establish by use," contracted from phrase (put) in ure "in practice" (early 15c.), from obsolete noun ure "work, practice, exercise, use," probably from Old French uevre, oeuvre "work," from Latin opera "work" (from PIE root *op- "to work, produce in abundance"). Meaning "toughen or harden by experience" is from late 15c. Related: Inured; inuring.
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