Etymology
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Gradus ad Parnassum (n.)

Latin, literally "A Step to Parnassus," the mountain sacred to Apollo and the Muses; from Latin gradus "a step; a step climbed; a step toward something" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Also see Parnassus. It was the title of a dictionary of prosody used in English public schools for centuries as a guide to Roman poetry. The book dates from the 1680s. Also the name of a treatise on musical composition written in Latin by Johann Joseph Fux, published in Vienna in 1725, and of a much-used book of exercises for piano.

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Druse 

also Druze, one of a people and Muslim sect centered in the mountains of Lebanon, 1786, from Arabic duruz, plural of darazi, from name of the sect founder, Ismail ad-Darazi (11c.), literally "Ismail the Tailor."

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Koblenz 

also Coblenz, city in Germany, founded by the Romans as a military outpost c. 8 B.C.E., from Latin ad confluentes "at the confluence" (see confluence); so named for its situation at the confluence of the Rhine and Moselle rivers.

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Ada 
fem. proper name, from Hebrew Adha, literally "ornament."
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Adelaide 
fem. proper name, from French Adélaide, from a Germanic source similar to Old High German Adalhaid, from adal "noble family" (see atheling) + German heit "state, rank," which is related to Old English -had "person, degree, state, nature" (see -hood). The first element affixed to French fem. ending -ine gave Adeline.
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Adolph 
also Adolf, masc. proper name, from Old High German Athalwolf "noble wolf," from athal "noble" (see atheling) + wolf (see wolf (n.)). The -ph is from the Latinized form of the name, Adolphus.
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Adeline 
fem. proper name, from French, of Germanic origin, literally "noblewoman," from adal "noble family" (see atheling) + French fem. suffix -ine (see -ine (1)).
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Adonai 
Old Testament word for "God," used as a substitute for the ineffable name, late 14c., from Medieval Latin, from Hebrew, literally "my lord," from adon (see Adonis) + suffix of the first person.
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Adrian 

masc. proper name, from Latin Adrianus, properly Hadrianus, literally "of the Adriatic" (see Adriatic). A name taken by several popes, including the only English pontiff, Nicholas Brakespear (died 1159). The fem. proper name Adrienne, etc., when not a fem. form of this, is a transposition of Ariadne. Adriane is the usual form of Ariadne in Chaucer ("House of Fame," etc.).

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Adelphi 
district of London, so called because it was laid out c. 1768 and built by four brothers of a family named Adam; from Greek adelphos "brother," literally "from the same womb, co-uterine," from copulative prefix a- "together with" (see a- (3)) + delphys "womb," which is perhaps related to dolphin. The district was the site of the popular Adelphi theater c. 1882-1900, which gave its name to a style of performance.
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