Etymology
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acting (adj.)

1590s, "putting forth activity, active," present-participle adjective from act (v.). Meaning "performing temporary duties" is from 1797.

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crowd (v.)

Old English crudan "to press, crush." Cognate with Middle Dutch cruden, Dutch kruijen "to press, push," Middle High German kroten "to press, oppress," Norwegian kryda "to crowd." Related: Crowded; crowding.

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acting (n.)

c. 1600, "performance of deeds;" 1660s, "performance of plays;" verbal noun from present participle of act (v.). Acting out "abnormal behavior caused by unconscious influences" is from 1945 in psychiatry.

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crowd (n.)

1560s, "large group of persons, multitude," from crowd (v.). The earlier word was press (n.). Crowd (n.) was used earlier in the now-archaic sense of "act of pressing or shoving" (c. 1300). From 1650s as "any group or company of persons contemplated in a mass." Crowd-pleaser is by 1924; crowd-control is by 1915; crowd-surf (v.) is by 1995; crowdsourcing (n.) is from 2006.

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self-acting (adj.)

1740, "acting by itself;" see self- + acting (adj.). The mechanical sense of "contrived for superseding manipulation in the management of a machine" is by 1844.

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overcrowd (v.)

also over-crowd, "fill or crowd to excess," 1766, from over- + crowd (v.). Related: Overcrowded; overcrowding.

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throng (n.)

c. 1300, probably shortened from Old English geþrang "crowd, tumult" (related to verb þringan "to push, crowd, press"), from Proto-Germanic *thrangan (source also of Old Norse þröng, Dutch drang, German Drang "crowd, throng").

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multitude (n.)

"a great number regarded collectively; a crowd or throng; the characteristic of being many, numerousness," early 14c., from Old French multitude (12c.) and directly from Latin multitudinem (nominative multitudo) "a great number, a crowd; the crowd, the common people," from multus "many, much" (see multi-) + suffix -tudo (see -tude). Related: Multitudes.

A multitude, however great, may be in a space so large as to give each one ample room; a throng or a crowd is generally smaller than a multitude, but is gathered into a close body, a throng being a company that presses together or forward, and a crowd carrying the closeness to uncomfortable physical contact. [Century Dictionary]
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madding (adj.)

"becoming mad, acting madly, raging, furious," 1570s, present-participle adjective from obsolete verb mad "to make insane; to become insane" (replaced by madden); now principally in the phrase far from the madding crowd, title of the popular 1874 novel of love and betrayal in rural England by Hardy, who lifted it from "Far from the madding crowd's ignoble strife," a line of Gray's "Elegy" (1749), which seems to echo and smooth a line from Drummond of Hawthornden from 1614 ("Farre from the madding Worldling's hoarse discords"). Related: Maddingly.

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caboodle (n.)

"crowd, pack, lot, company," 1848, see kit and caboodle.

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