Etymology
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deoxyribonucleic (n.)

1931, in deoxyribonucleic acid (originally desoxyribonucleic), a nucleic acid which yields deoxyribose on hydrolysis, from deoxyribose (q.v.) + nucleic acid (see nucleic). It is generally found in chromosomes of higher organisms and stores genetic information.

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aqua fortis (n.)

also aquafortis, old commercial name for "diluted nitric acid," c. 1600, Latin, literally "strong water;" for the elements, see aqua- + fort. Also see aqua. So called for its power of dissolving metals (copper, silver) which are unaffected by other agents.

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carbon dioxide (n.)
1869, so called because it consists of one carbon and two oxygen atoms. The chemical was known since mid-18c. under the name fixed air; later as carbonic acid gas (1791). "The term dioxide for an oxide containing two atoms of oxygen came into use in the middle of the 19th century." [Flood].
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