Etymology
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accurate (adj.)
1610s, "done with care," from Latin accuratus "prepared with care, exact, elaborate," past participle of accurare "take care of," from ad "to" (see ad-) + curare "take care of" (see cure (n.1)). The notion of doing something carefully led to that of being precise (1650s). A stronger word than correct (adj.), weaker than exact (adj.). Related: Accurately; accurateness.
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accuracy (n.)
"state of being extremely precise or exact; conformity to truth," 1660s, from accurate + abstract noun suffix -cy.
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inaccurate (adj.)

"not exact or correct," 1690s, from in- (1) "not" + accurate. Unaccurate is attested from 1670s. Related: Inaccurately (1660s).

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exact (adj.)
"precise, rigorous, accurate," 1530s, from Latin exactus "precise, accurate, highly finished," past-participle adjective from exigere "demand, require, enforce," literally "to drive or force out," also "to finish, measure," from ex "out" (see ex-) + agere "to set in motion, drive, drive forward; to do, perform" (from PIE root *ag- "to drive, draw out or forth, move").
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re-enactor (n.)

1965, agent noun from re-enact (v.). Specifically, "one whose hobby or profession is to embody accurate historical presentation" by 1984, American English.

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undeceived (adj.)

c. 1400, "reliable, accurate, certain," from un- (1) "not" + past participle of deceive (v.). Sense of "freed from deception or false belief" is by 1590s, from undeceive (v.).

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photographic (adj.)

"of, pertaining to, using, or produced by photography," 1839, from photograph + -ic. Meaning "minutely accurate" is by 1864; photographic memory is from 1865. Related: Photographical; photographically.

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vouch (v.)

early 14c., "summon into court to prove a title," from Anglo-French voucher, Old French vocher "to call, summon, invoke, claim," probably from Gallo-Roman *voticare, metathesis of Latin vocitare "to call to, summon insistently," frequentative of Latin vocare "to call, call upon, summon," which is related to vox (genitive vocis) "voice" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Meaning "guarantee to be true or accurate" is first attested 1590s. Related: Vouched; vouching.

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revised (adj.)

past-participle adjective from revise (v.). Revised Version of the Bible was done 1870-84 in Great Britain by more than 50 scholars from various denominations; so called because it was a revision of the 1611 ("King James") translation, also known as the Authorized Version. More accurate, less lovely.

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rigorous (adj.)

early 15c., of persons, "strict, exacting, harsh, stern;" of laws, actions, etc., "marked by inflexibility, severe, exacting," hence "unmitigated, merciless;" from Old French rigorous (13c., Modern French rigoureux), from Medieval Latin rigorosus, from Latin rigor "stiffness, firmness" (see rigor). The meaning "scrupulously accurate, precise" is from 1650s. Related: Rigorously; rigorousness (c. 1400).

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