Etymology
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according (adj./adv.)

c. 1300, "matching, similar, corresponding" (a sense now obsolete), present-participle adjective and adverb from accord (v.). Meanings "conforming (to), compliant, in agreement; consistent, harmonious; suitable, appropriate" are from late 14c. According to "referring to," literally "in a manner agreeing with" is from late 14c. As an adverb, "often applied to persons, but referring elliptically to their statements or opinions" [Century Dictionary].

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accordingly (adv.)
mid-14c., "in agreement with" (now obsolete), from according + -ly (2). From mid-15c. as "properly, adequately;" meaning "agreeably with logic or expectation" is from 1680s.
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accord (v.)
Origin and meaning of accord
early 12c., "come into agreement," also "agree, be in harmony," from Old French acorder "agree, be in harmony" (12c.), from Vulgar Latin *accordare "make agree," literally "be of one heart, bring heart to heart," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + cor (genitive cordis) "heart" (used figuratively for "soul, mind"), from PIE root *kerd- "heart." Compare concord, discord. Related: Accorded; according.
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OED 
initialism (acronym) of Oxford English Dictionary, attested from 1898, according to the "Oxford English Dictionary."
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reported (adj.)
"according to report," 1812, past-participle adjective from report (v.). Related: Reportedly.
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indices (n.)
according to OED, the plural form of index preferable in scientific and mathematical senses of that word.
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carnally (adv.)
late 15c., "sexually, according to the flesh;" 1530s, "corporeally, not spiritually;" from carnal + -ly (2).
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torii (n.)
singular and plural, "gateway to a Shinto temple," Japanese, according to OED from tori "bird" + i "to sit, to perch."
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alack (interj.)
expression of sorrow or dismay, mid-15c. contraction of ah, lack, which according to Skeat is from lack (n.) in its secondary Middle English sense of "loss, failure, fault, reproach, shame." According to OED, originally an expression of dissatisfaction, later of regret or unpleasant surprise. Sometimes extended as alackaday ("alack the day").
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gammer (n.)
"old woman," 1570s, contraction of grandmother (corresponding to gaffer, but according to OED representing a different construction).
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