Etymology
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absence (n.)
Origin and meaning of absence
"state of not being present," late 14c., from Old French absence "absence" (14c.), from Latin absentia, abstract noun from absentem (nominative absens), present participle of abesse "be away from, be absent," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + esse "to be" (from PIE root *es- "to be"). Absence makes the heart grow fonder is a line from the song "Isle of Beauty" by English poet and composer Thomas Haynes Bayly (1797-1839).
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in absentia (adv.)
Latin, literally "in (his/her/their) absence" (see absence). By 1831 in English, earlier in legal Latin.
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*es- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to be."

It forms all or part of: absence; absent; am; Bodhisattva; entity; essence; essential; essive; eu-; eucalyptus; Eucharist; Euclidean; Eudora; Eugene; eugenics; eulogy; Eunice; euphemism; euphoria; euthanasia; homoiousian; improve; interest; is; onto-; Parousia; present (adj.) "existing at the time;" present (n.2) "what is offered or given as a gift;" proud; quintessence; represent; satyagraha; sin; sooth; soothe; suttee; swastika; yes.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit asmi, Hittite eimi, Greek esti-, Latin est, Old Church Slavonic jesmi, Lithuanian esmi, Gothic imi, Old English eom, German ist.

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simpleness (n.)
14c., "absence of pride," from simple (adj.) + -ness. From late 14c. as "absence of duplicity; ignorance; absence of complexity."
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non-aggression (n.)

also nonaggression, "absence of aggression," especially "absence of warlike intentions among nations," 1833, from non- + aggression.

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coolness (n.)

Old English colnesse "a moderate degree of cold, somewhat low temperature;" see cool (adj.) + -ness. Figurative sense of "absence of mental confusion or excitement" is from 1650s; that of "absence of warm affection" is from 1670s; that of "quiet, unabashed impudence" is by 1751.

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insensibility (n.)
late 14c., "absence of physical sensation, numbness," from Late Latin insensibilitas, from insensibilis "that cannot be felt" (see insensible). Meaning "quality of being imperceptible" is from 1630s. Meaning "absence of moral feeling, indifference" is from 1690s.
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nothingness (n.)

"nonexistence, absence or negation of being," 1630s, from nothing + -ness.

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asepsis (n.)
"absence of micro-organisms causing putrefaction or fermentation," 1855, from a- (3) "not" + sepsis.
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absent (prep.)
Origin and meaning of absent
"in the absence of," 1944, principally from U.S. legal use, from absent (adj.).
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