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ablative (n.)

"grammatical case denoting removal or separation," late 14c. as an adjective; mid-15c. as a noun (short for ablative case, originally of Latin), from Old French ablatif and directly from Latin (casus) ablativus "(case) of removal," expressing direction from a place or time, coined by Julius Caesar from ablatus "taken away," past participle of auferre "to carry off or away, withdraw, remove," from ab "off, away" (see ab-) + the irregular verb ferre (past participle latum; see oblate) "to carry, to bear" (from PIE root *bher- (1) "to carry," also "to bear children."). The "from" case, the Latin case of adverbial relation, typically expressing removal or separation, also "source or place of an action." Related: Ablatival.

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ipso facto 
Latin adverbial phrase, literally "by that very fact, by the fact itself," from neuter ablative of ipse "he, himself, self" + ablative of factum "fact" (see fact).
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nem. con. 

abbreviation of Latin phrase nemine contradicente "no one dissenting," hence, "without opposition." From ablative of nemo "nobody" + ablative present participle of contradicere.

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jure divino 
"by divine right," Latin phrase, from ablative of jus "law, right, justice" (see jurist) + ablative of divinus (see divine (adj.)).
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ore rotundo (adv.)

1720, Latin, literally "with round mouth," from ablative of os "mouth" (see oral) + ablative of rotundus "round" (see rotund). From Horace ("Grais ingenium, Grais dedit ore rotundo Musa loqui," in "Ars Poetica").

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Deo vindice 

Latin, "(with) God (as our) defender," national motto of the Confederate States of America, from ablative of Deus "God" (see Zeus) + ablative of present participle of  vindicare "to liberate; to act as avenger; protect, defend" (see vindication).

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viva voce 
also viva-voce, "by word of mouth," 1580s, Latin, literally "living-voice," ablative of viva vox.
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No. 
as an abbreviation meaning (and pronounced) "number," 1660s, from Latin numero, ablative singular of numerus (see number (n.)).
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in utero 
1713, Latin, literally "in the uterus," from ablative of uterus (see uterus).
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in situ 
1740, Latin, literally "in its (original) place or position," from ablative of situs "site" (see site (n.)).
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