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abandoned (adj.)
"self-devoted" to some practice or purpose (usually evil), late 14c., past-participle adjective from abandon (v.) in the reflexive sense. Hence, in a general way, "shamelessly wicked" (1690s). Meaning "deserted, forsaken" is from late 15c.
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derelict (adj.)

1640s, "left, abandoned by the owner or guardian," from Latin derelictus "solitary, deserted," past participle of dereliquere "to abandon, forsake, desert," from de- "entirely" (see de-) + relinquere "leave behind, forsake, abandon, give up," from re- "back" (see re-) + linquere "to leave," from PIE root *leikw- "to leave."

Originally especially of vessels abandoned at sea or stranded on shore. Of persona, "unfaithful, neglectful of responsibility," by 1864. As a noun, "property which is abandoned," from 1660s. As "person abandoned or forsaken," 1728.

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destitute (adj.)

c. 1400, "abandoned, forsaken," from Latin destitutus "abandoned," past participle of destituere "forsake," from de "away" (see de-) + statuere "put, place," causative of stare "to stand," from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm." Originally literal; of persons, "forlorn, hopeless," 1510s; sense of "lacking resources, without means, impoverished, indigent" is by 1530s. As a noun, "severely impoverished persons collectively," 1737.

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brownfield (n.)
abandoned or disused industrial land, often contaminated to some degree, 1992, American English, from brown (adj.) + field (n.).
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reprobate (n.)

1540s, "one rejected by God, person given over to sin," from reprobate (adj.). Sense of "abandoned or unprincipled person" is from 1590s.

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disused (n.)

1520s, "disaccustomed, not wonted" (a sense now obsolete), past-participle adjective from disuse (v.). Meaning "no longer used, abandoned" is from 1610s.

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cast-off (adj.)

1709, "put aside, rejected," from verbal phrase cast off "discard, reject" (c. 1400), from cast (v.) + off (adv.). From 1741 as a noun, "person or thing abandoned as worthless or useless." Related" Cast-offs.

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profligate (adj.)

1520s, "overthrown, routed, defeated, conquered" (now obsolete in this sense), from Latin profligatus "destroyed, ruined, corrupt, abandoned, dissolute," past participle of profligare "to cast down, defeat, ruin," from pro "down, forth" (see pro-) + fligere "to strike" (see afflict).

The main modern meaning "recklessly extravagant" is attested by 1779, via the notion of "ruined in morals, abandoned to vice" (1640s, implied in a use of profligation, an obsolete word attested from mid-15c. but first in a sense of "elimination, banishment"). Related: Profligately. As a noun, "one who has lost all regard for good principles," from 1709.

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freedman (n.)
"manumitted slave," c. 1600, from past participle of free (adj.) + man (n.). Especially in U.S. history. The older word is freeman. Freedman's Bureau (1865) was the popular name of the "Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen, and Abandoned Lands," an office of the War Department established by Congress March 3, 1865, and discontinued in 1872.
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desolate (adj.)

mid-14c., of persons, "disconsolate, miserable, overwhelmed with grief, deprived of comfort;" late 14c., of persons, "without companions, solitary, lonely;" also, of places, "uninhabited, abandoned," from Latin desolatus, past participle of desolare "leave alone, desert," from de- "completely" (see de-) + solare "make lonely," from solus "alone" (see sole (adj.)). Related: Desolately; desolateness.

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