Etymology
Advertisement
adjournment (n.)

mid-15c., ajournement, "act of postponing or deferring (a court, assembly, etc.)," from Old French ajornement "daybreak, dawn; summons (to appear in court)," from ajorner (see adjourn), with unetymological -d- added in English on the mistaken expectation of a Latin origin.

Adjournment is the act by which an assembly suspends its session in virtue of authority inherent in itself; it may be also the time or interval of such suspension. A recess is a customary suspension of business, as during the period of certain recognized or legal holidays .... Recess is also popularly used for a brief suspension of business for any reason: as, it was agreed that there be a recess of ten minutes. [Century Dictionary]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
adjudge (v.)

late 14c., ajuge, "to make a judicial decision, decide by judicial opinion," from Old French ajugier "to judge, pass judgment on" (Modern French adjuger; the -d- was restored 14c. and English followed suit by 16c.), from Latin adiudicare "grant or award as a judge," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iudicare "to judge," which is related to iudicem "a judge" (see judge (n.)). The sense of "have an opinion" is from c. 1400. Related: Adjudged; adjudging.

Related entries & more 
adjudicate (v.)

"pronounce judgement upon, reward judicially," 1700, a back-formation from adjudication, or else from Latin adiudicatus, past participle of adiudicare "grant or award as a judge" (see adjudge). Related: Adjudicated; adjudicating.

Related entries & more 
adjudication (n.)

1690s, "action of adjudging," from French adjudication or directly from Late Latin adiudicationem (nominative adiudicatio), noun of action from past-participle stem of adiudicare "grant or award as a judge" (see adjudge). By 1782 as "a judicial settlement."

Related entries & more 
adjudicative (adj.)

"involving or pertaining to adjudication," 1809; see adjudicate + -ive. Perhaps modeled on French adjudicatif. Especially in law, "useful in determining the outcome of a case."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
adjudicator (n.)

"one who adjudicates," 1804, agent noun in Latin form from adjudicate.

Related entries & more 
adjunct (adj.)

"united with another in office or action," 1590s, from Latin adiunctus "closely connected, joined, united," past participle of adiungere "to join to," usually with a notion of subordination, but this is not etymological (see adjoin). Adjunct professor is attested by 1826, American English.

Related entries & more 
adjunct (n.)
1580s, "something added to but not an essential part of (something else)," from Latin adiunctus "closely connected, joined, united" (as a noun, "a characteristic, essential attribute"), past participle of adiungere "join to" (see adjoin).
Related entries & more 
adjuration (n.)

late 14c., "exorcism," from Late Latin adiurationem (nominative adiuratio) "a swearing to," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin adiurare "to put (someone) to an oath," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iurare "swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law," from PIE root *yewes- "law" (see jurist). Originally a term in exorcism (with conjuration); the general sense of "a solemn oath, a charging under the penalty of a curse" is from 17c.

Related entries & more 
adjure (v.)

late 14c., adjuren, "to bind by oath; to question under oath;" c. 1400 as "to charge with an oath or under penalty of a curse," from Latin adiurare "confirm by oath, add an oath, to swear to in addition; call to witness," in Late Latin "to put (someone) to an oath," from ad "to" (see ad-) + iurare "swear," from ius (genitive iuris) "law" (see jurist). Related: Adjured; adjuring.

Related entries & more 

Page 55