Etymology
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acclaim (n.)
"act of acclaiming, a shout of joy," 1667 (in Milton), from acclaim (v.).
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acclamation (n.)

1540s, "act of shouting or applauding in approval," from Latin acclamationem (nominative acclamatio) "a calling, exclamation, shout of approval," noun of action from past-participle stem of acclamare "to call to, cry out at, shout approval or disapproval of," from assimilated form of ad "to, toward" (see ad-) + clamare "cry out" (from PIE root *kele- (2) "to shout"). As a method of spontaneous approval of resolutions, etc., by unanimous voice vote, by 1801, probably from the French Revolution.

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acclimate (v.)

1792, "habituate (something) to a new climate," from French acclimater, verb formed from à "to" (see ad-) + climat (see climate). Intransitive sense "adapt to a new climate" is from 1861. Related: Acclimated; acclimating. The extended form acclimatize is now more common in the older sense of this word (generally in reference to plants or animals), leaving to this word the intransitive sense, which more often refers to humans.

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acclimation (n.)
1826, noun of action from acclimate, "by form-assoc. with words like narrate, narration, in which -ate is a vbl. ending: in acclimate it is part of the stem" [OED]. The word is attested earlier in German and French. Coleridge has acclimatement (1823), which also is found earlier in French.
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acclimatization (n.)
"modification of a living thing to allow it to endure in a foreign climate," 1830, noun of action from acclimate. There is or was a tendency to use this word in reference to animals and plants and acclimation of humans.
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acclimatize (v.)

1824, "modify a living thing to suit a foreign climate" (transitive); see acclimate + -ize. A more recent formation than acclimate and generally replacing it in this sense. Related: Acclimatized; acclimatizing. Simple climatize is attested from 1826 as "inure (a living thing) to a climate."

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acclinal (adj.)

in geology, "leaning against," as one stratum of rock against another, both turned up at an angle, 1837, from Latin acclinis "leaning on or against," related to acclinare "to lean on or against," from assimilated form of ad "to, upon" (see ad-) + clinare "to bend" (from PIE *klein-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean").

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acclivity (n.)
Origin and meaning of acclivity

"upward slope of ground," 1610s, from Latin acclivitatem (nominative acclivitas) "an ascending direction, rising grade, upward steepness," from acclivis "mounting upwards, ascending," from ad "to, up to" (see ad-) + clivus "hill, a slope" (from PIE *klei-wo-, suffixed form of root *klei- "to lean").

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accolade (n.)

1620s, "an embrace about the neck then the tapping of a sword on the shoulders to confer knighthood," from French accolade "an embrace, a kiss" (16c.), from Provençal acolada or Italian accollata, ultimately from noun use of a fem. past participle of Vulgar Latin *accollare "to embrace around the neck," from Latin ad "to" (see ad-) + collum "neck" (compare collar (n.)), from PIE root *kwel- (1) "revolve, move round." Also see -ade.

The extended meaning "praise, award" is by 1851. The earlier form of the word in English was accoll (mid-14c.), from Old French acolee "an embrace, kiss, especially that given to a new-made knight," a noun use of the past participle of the verb acoler. The French noun in the 16c. was altered to accolade, with the foreign suffix, and English followed suit.

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accommodate (v.)

1530s, "fit one thing to another," from Latin accomodatus "suitable, fit, appropriate to," past participle of accomodare "make fit, make fit for, adapt, fit one thing to another," from ad "to" (see ad-) + commodare "make fit," from commodus ""proper, fit, appropriate, convenient, satisfactory," from com-, here as an intensive prefix (see com-), + modus "measure, manner" (from PIE root *med- "take appropriate measures").

From late 16c. as "make suitable," also "furnish (someone) with what is wanted," especially "furnish with suitable room and comfort" (1712). Related: Accommodated; accommodating.

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