Etymology
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zoster (n.)

kind of seaweed, c. 1600, Latin, from Greek zōstēr "girdle," originally "warrior's belt," from zōnnynai (see zone (n.)). Meaning "shingles" is from 1706; in the literal sense, "a belt or girdle, especially for men," from 1824.

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shingles (n.)
"inflammatory disease of the skin," late 14c., from Medieval Latin cingulus (loan-translation of Greek zoster "girdle"), variant of Latin cingulum "girdle," from cingere "to gird" (see cinch (n.)). The inflammation often extends around the middle of the body, like a girdle.
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