Etymology
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workman (n.)

Old English weorcmsnn; see work (n.) + man (n.). Similar formation in Dutch werkman, Old Norse verkmaðr.

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workmanlike (adj.)

"efficient, no-nonsense," 1739, from workman + like (adj.).

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workmanship (n.)

early 14c., "performance of labor," from workman + -ship. Meaning "skill as a workman" is from 1520s.

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architectonic (adj.)

1640s (architectonical is from 1590s), "pertaining to architecture," from Latin architectonicus, from Greek arkhitektonikos "pertaining to a master builder," from arkhitekton "chief workman" (see architect). The metaphysical sense, "pertaining to systematization of knowledge," is from 1801.

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farm-hand (n.)

also farmhand, "hired laborer on a farm," by 1835, from farm (n.) + hand (n.) in the "hired workman" sense.

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ergative (adj.)

1943, in reference to grammatical case used for the subjects of transitive verbs (in Eskimo, Basque, Caucasian languages), from Greek ergatēs "workman," from combining form of ergon "work" (from PIE root *werg- "to do") + -ive.

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swamper (n.)

1735, "one who lives in a swampy district," from swamp (n.). Meaning "workman who clears a lumber road through swamp or forest" is 1857, American English; meaning "all-purpose assistant in a restaurant or saloon" is from 1907.

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haggle (v.)

1570s, "to cut unevenly, mangle in cutting" (implied in haggler "clumsy workman"), frequentative of haggen "to chop" (see hack (v.1)). Sense of "argue about price" first recorded c. 1600, probably from notion of chopping away. Related: Haggled; haggling.

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architecture (n.)

1560s, "the art of building," especially of fine or beautiful building; "tasteful application of scientific and traditional rules of good construction to the materials at hand," from French architecture, from Latin architectura, from architectus "master builder, chief workman" (see architect). The meaning "buildings constructed architecturally" is from 1610s.

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setter (n.)

"one who or that which sets (something)," c. 1400, "workman who lays stone, brick, etc.," agent noun from set (v.). As the name of an implement or object from 1520s. As a type of hunting-dog (originally a type of spaniel), 1570s, so called for the dog's habit of of sitting or crouching when it scents game.

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