Etymology
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withdraw (v.)
early 13c. (transitive), "to take back," from with "away" + drawen "to draw," possibly a loan-translation of Latin retrahere "to retract." Intransitive sense from mid-13c. Sense of "to remove oneself" is recorded from c. 1300. Related: Withdrawn; withdrawing.
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drawing room (n.)

"room appropriated for the reception of company," 1640s, short for withdrawing room (16c.; see withdraw), into which ladies would retire after dinner. Earlier in the sense of "private room" as draw-chamber (mid-15c.); drawyng chaumber (early 15c.).

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draw (n.)

c. 1400, "act of pulling," from draw (v.). Meaning "game or contest that ends without a winner," is attested first in drawn match (1610s), but the signification is uncertain origin; some speculate it is from withdraw. Hence, as a verb, "to leave (a game, etc.) undecided," from 1837.

Colloquial sense of "anything that can draw a crowd" is from 1881 (from the verb in the related sense). 

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withdrawal (n.)
1820s, "act of taking back," also "retraction of a statement," from withdraw + -al (2). Earlier words in the same sense were withdrawment (1640s); withdraught (mid-14c.). Meaning "removal of money from a bank, etc." is from 1861; psychological sense is from 1916; meaning "physical reaction to the cessation of an addictive substance" is from 1929 (with an isolated use from 1897; withdrawal symptom is from 1910). As a synonym for coitus interruptus from 1889.
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subduce (v.)

mid-15c., "to delete;" 1540s, "to withdraw oneself" (from a place, allegiance, etc.), from Latin subducere "to draw away, withdraw, remove," from sub "under, below" (see sub-) + ducere "to lead" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Related: Subduced; subducing.

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retire (v.)

1530s, of armies, "to retreat, draw back," also, of persons, "to withdraw" to some place, especially for the sake of privacy; from French retirer "to withdraw (something)," from re- "back" (see re-) + Old French tirer "to draw" (see tirade). Related: Retired; retiring.

The sense of "leave one's business or occupation" is by 1660s. The meaning "to leave company and go to bed" is from 1660s. Transitive sense is from 1540s, originally "withdraw, lead back" (troops, etc.); meaning "to remove from active service" is from 1680s. Baseball sense of "to put out" (a batter or team) is recorded by 1874.

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abscess (n.)
Origin and meaning of abscess
in pathology, "collection of pus in some part of the body," 1610s, from Latin abscessus "an abscess" (the Latin word was used in a medical sense by Celsus), literally "a going away, departure," from the stem of abscedere "withdraw, depart, retire," from ab "off, away from" (see ab-) + cedere "to go, withdraw" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). The notion is that humors "go from" the body through the pus in the swelling.
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recede (v.)

early 15c., receden, "to depart, go away," a sense now rare or obsolete; of things, "to move back, retreat, withdraw,"  from Old French receder and directly from Latin recedere "to go back, fall back; withdraw, depart, retire," from re- "back" (see re-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield"). Sense of "to have a backward inclination, slope, or tendency" is by 1866. Related: Receded; receding.

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secede (v.)

1702, "to leave one's companions, go apart, retire, withdraw," from Latin secedere "go away, withdraw, separate; rebel, revolt," from se- "apart" (see se-) + cedere "to go" (from PIE root *ked- "to go, yield").

The sense of "withdraw from a political or religious alliance or union" is recorded from 1755, originally especially in reference to the ministers who left the Church of Scotland about 1733 (Seceders); later, in U.S. history, to the attempt by Southern states to separate from the union (1861). Related: Seceded; seceding.

From the Latin past-participle (secessus), English once had secess "a going away, withdrawal, retirement" (1560s), and Chauliac (early 15c.) has a noun secesse "purging of the bowels."

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