Etymology
Advertisement
Wisconsin 
organized as a U.S. territory 1836; admitted as a state 1848. Originally applied to the Wisconsin River; a native name of unknown origin. Early spellings include Mescousing and Wishkonsing.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Kleenex (n.)
1924, proprietary name, registered by Cellucotton Products Company, Neenah, Wisconsin, U.S.; later Kimberly-Clark Corp. An arbitrary alteration of clean + brand-name suffix -ex.
Related entries & more 
Winnebago 
"Siouan people of eastern Wisconsin," 1766, from Potawatomi winepyekoha, literally "person of dirty water," in reference to the muddy or fish-clogged waters of the Fox River below Lake Winnebago. As a type of motor vehicle, attested from 1966.
Related entries & more 
Warfarin (n.)
1950, from WARF, acronym from Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation + -arin, from Coumarin. The organization describes itself as "an independent, nonprofit foundation chartered to support research at the U[niversity of] W[isconsin]-Madison and the designated technology transfer organization for the university."
Related entries & more 
Oneida 

Iroquois people of upper N.Y. state (they later moved in part to Wisconsin), 1660s, named for their principal settlement, the name of which is from Oneida onenyote', literally "erected stone," containing -neny- "stone" and -ot- "to stand."

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
Menominee 

also Menomini, Algonquian people of Wisconsin, also of their language, from Ojibwa (Algonquian) Manoominii, literally "wild rice people," from manoomin "wild rice." Not their name for themselves.

Related entries & more 
muskeg (n.)

kind of North American bog, 1865, from Cree (Algonquian) /maske:k/ "swamp;" compare Abenaki mskag, Munsee Delaware maskeekw, and Ojibwa mshkiig, which probably is an element in the place names Muskego (Wisconsin) and Muskegon (Michigan).

Related entries & more 
boo-ya (interj.)

also booyah, exclamation used in various situations, attested c. 1990 in hip-hop slang and to have been popularized by U.S. sports announcer Stuart Scott (1965-2015) on ESPN's SportsCenter. A 1991 magazine article has booyah as a Wisconsin word for "bouillon," based on an inability to spell the latter.

Related entries & more 
skiing (n.)

1885, verbal noun from ski (v.).

THE new sport which has lately been introduced at Beloit is skeeing. They are long ash planks, carefully and turned up at the end, and are warranted to take down hill quicker than a wink. After some practice performers become very expert, and the speed with which they go is something surprising. [Beloit College, Wisconsin, Round Table, Dec. 18, 1885]
Related entries & more 
back seat (n.)

also back-seat, 1832, originally of coaches, from back (adj.) + seat (n.). Used figuratively for "less or least prominent position" by 1868. Back-seat driver attested by 1923.

You know him. The one who sits on the back seat and tells the driver what to do. He issues a lot of instructions, gives advice, offers no end of criticism and doesn't do a bit of work. ["The Back Seat Driver," Wisconsin Congregational Church Life, May 1923]
Related entries & more