Etymology
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injury (n.)

late 14c., "harm, damage, loss; a specific injury," from Anglo-French injurie "wrongful action" (Old French injure, 13c.), from Latin iniuria "wrong, an injustice, insult, unlawful violence, assault, damage, harm," noun use of fem. of iniurius "wrongful, unjust, unlawful," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + ius (genitive iuris) "right, law" (see jurist).

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whiplash (n.)

1570s, "the lash of a whip," from whip (n.) + lash (n.). The injury caused by sudden head motion so called by 1955, in reference to the notion of moving to and fro like a cracking whip. The verb in this sense is recorded by 1971.

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injure (v.)

mid-15c., "do an injustice to, dishonor," probably a back-formation from injury, or else from Old French injuriier "to damage; offend," from Latin iniuriari "do an injury," from iniuria. Injury itself also served as a verb meaning "to injure, hurt, harm" (late 15c.). Related: Injured; injuring.

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hurt (n.)

c. 1200, "a wound, an injury;" also "sorrow, lovesickness," from hurt (v.). Old French had hurte (n.), but the sense "injury" is only in English.

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revenge (n.)

"retaliation for wrongs real or fancied, act of doing harm or injury in return for wrong or injury suffered," 1540s, from French revenge, a back-formation from revengier (see revenge (v.)). Hence "vindictive feeling, desire to be revenged."

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physiotherapy (n.)

"treatment of disease, injury, etc. by physical methods," 1905, from physio- + therapy. Related: Physiotherapist; physiotherapeutic.

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ahimsa (n.)

doctrine of non-violence, 1875, from Sanskrit ahimsa, from a "without" (from PIE root *ne- "not") + himsa "injury."

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self-preservation (n.)

"preservation of oneself from destruction or injury," especially as an instinct or natural law, 1610s; see self- + preservation.

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bruise (n.)

"contusion without laceration, superficial injury caused by impact," 1540s, from bruise (v.).

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revengeful (adj.)

"vindictive, full of desire to inflict injury or pain for wrongs received," 1580s; see revenge (n.) + -ful. Related: Revengefully; revengefulness.

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