Etymology
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reception (n.)

late 14c., recepcion, in astrology, "the effect of two planets on each other;" late 15c. in the general sense of "the act or fact of getting or receiving; the receiving of something in the manner of a receptacle;" from Old French reception and directly from Latin receptionem (nominative receptio) "a receiving," noun of action from past-participle stem of recipere  "to hold, contain" (see receive).

The sense of "action of receiving (persons) or of being received in a formal or ceremonial manner" is from 1660s; earlier it meant act or fact of being received into a company, class, etc., or in a certain manner (1640s). The meaning "ceremonial gathering of persons to be received or greeted" is by 1865, from a sense in French. Radio (later television) sense of "the receiving of broadcast signals" is by 1907. Reception room, set aside for the reception of visitors, is by 1829.

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wedding (n.)

Old English weddung "state of being wed; pledge, betrothal; action of marrying," verbal noun from wed (v.). Meaning "nuptials, ceremony of marriage" is recorded from early 13c.; the usual Old English word for the ceremony was bridelope, literally "bridal run," in reference to conducting the bride to her new home. Wedding ring is from late 14c.; wedding cake is recorded from 1640s, as a style of architecture from 1879. Wedding dress is attested from 1779; wedding reception from 1856.

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hymeneal (adj.)
c. 1600, "of or relating to a marriage," with -al (1) + Hymen, Greek god of marriage. Compare Latin hymenaeus, from Greek hymenaios "belonging to wedlock;" also as a noun "wedding, wedding song." As a noun in English, "wedding hymn," from 1717.
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at-home (n.)
"reception of visitors," 1745, noun use of prepositional phrase at home.
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-gamous 
word-forming element meaning "marrying," from Greek gamos "marriage, a wedding" (see gamete) + -ous.
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groomsman (n.)
attendant on a bridegroom at a wedding, 1690s, from possessive of groom (n.2) + man (n.).
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nuptials (n.)

"marriage, wedding," 1550s, plural of nuptial. Now always plural, but Shakespeare uses the singular.

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honeymoon (v.)
"take a wedding trip," 1821, from honeymoon (n.). Related: Honeymooned; honeymooning; honeymooner. The first TV "Honeymooners" sketch aired in 1951.
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bridal (adj.)
"belonging to a bride or a wedding," c. 1200, transferred use of noun bridal "wedding feast," Old English brydealo "marriage feast," from bryd ealu, literally "bride ale" (see bride + ale); the second element later was confused with suffix -al (1), especially after c. 1600. Bridal-suite is from 1857.
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groom (n.2)
"husband-to-be at a wedding; newly married man," c. 1600 (usually as a correlative of bride), short for bridegroom (q.v.), in which the second element is Old English guma "man."
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