Etymology
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wearisome (adj.)
mid-15c., "weary," also "causing weariness," from weary + -some (1).
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tedious (adj.)
early 15c., from Old French tedieus, from Late Latin taediosus "wearisome, irksome, tedious," from Latin taedium (see tedium). Related: Tediously; tediousness.
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burdensome (adj.)
"heavy, wearisome," 1570s, from burden (n.1) + -some (1). Earlier was burdenous (1520s). Related: Burdensomeness.
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laborious (adj.)
late 14c., "hard-working, industrious," from Old French laborios "arduous, wearisome; hard-working" (12c., Modern French laborieux), from Latin laboriosus "toilsome, wearisome, troublesome," also "inclined to labor, industrious," from labor "toil, exertion" (see labor (n.)). Meaning "costing much labor, burdensome" is from early 15c.; meaning "resulting from hard work" is mid-15c. Related: Laboriousness.
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ad nauseam (adv.)
"to a sickening extent," Latin, literally "to sickness," from ad "to" (see ad-) + nauseam, accusative of nausea (see nausea). Especially of the disgust aroused by wearisome repetition.
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tedium (n.)

"tediousness," 1660s, from Latin taedium "weariness, irksomeness, disgust" (mostly post-classical), which is related to taedet "it is wearisome, it excites loathing" (in Late Latin "be disgusted with, be weary of") and to taedere "to weary," but the whole group is of uncertain etymology. Possible cognates are Old Church Slavonic težo, Lithuanian tingiu, tingėti "to be dull, be listless."

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monotony (n.)

1706, originally in transferred sense of "wearisome sameness, tiresome uniformity or lack of variation," from French monotonie (1670s), from Greek monotonia "sameness of tone, monotony," from monotonos "of one and the same tone," from monos "single, alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + tonos "tone," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Literal sense of "sameness of tone or pitch" is attested in English from 1724.

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