Etymology
Advertisement
Walker 

surname, early 13c., probably an agent noun from walk (v.) in the sense "to full cloth." preserves the cloth-fulling sense (walker with this meaning is attested from c. 1300). "Walker" or "Hookey Walker" was a common slang retort of incredulity in early and mid-19c. London, for which "Various problematic explanations have been offered" [Century Dictionary].

"Is it?" said Scrooge. "Go and buy it."
"Walk-ER!" exclaimed the boy.
"No, no," said Scrooge. "I am in earnest" (etc.)
[Dickens, "A Christmas Carol"]
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
street-walker (n.)
"common prostitute," 1590s, from street (n.) + agent noun from walk (v.).
Related entries & more 
fire-walker (n.)

one who walks barefoot over hot coals without injury, as an entertainment, etc., 1895, from fire (n.) + agent noun from walk (v.). Related: Fire-walking.

Related entries & more 
ambulatory (n.)
"part of a building intended for walking," 1620s, from Medieval Latin ambulatorium, from Latin ambulatorius "movable, of or pertaining to a walker," from ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)).
Related entries & more 
pedestrian (n.)

1793, "a walker, one who walks or journeys on foot," from pedestrian (adj.). In early use especially "one who walks or races on foot for a wager; a professional walker; one who has made a notable record for speed or endurance." In 20c. it came to mean especially "person walking on a road or pavement" as opposed to person driving or riding in a motor vehicle.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
hypnobate (n.)

"sleep-walker," 1890, from French hypnobate, from Greek hypnos "sleep" (from PIE root *swep- "to sleep") + batos, verbal adjective of bainein "to go, walk, step" (from PIE root *gwa- "to go, come"). Related: Hypnobatia.

Related entries & more 
goer (n.)
late 14c., "one who goes on foot, a walker," agent noun of go (v.). From mid-13c. as a surname. Of a horse, especially of one that goes fast (1690s); hence transferred use, of persons, "one who lives loosely" (c. 1810).
Related entries & more 
ambulatory (adj.)
1620s, "pertaining to walking;" also "movable; shifting, not permanent," from Latin ambulatorius "pertaining to a walker; movable," from ambulator, agent noun from past participle stem of ambulare "to walk, go about" (see amble (v.)). Middle English had ambulary "movable" (mid-15c.). Related: Ambulatorial.
Related entries & more 
go-cart (n.)
also gocart, 1670s, originally "a litter, sedan chair;" also "an infant's walker" (1680s), from go + cart (n.). Later also of hand carts (1759). The modern form go-kart (1959) was coined in reference to a kind of miniature racing car with a frame body and a two-stroke engine.
Related entries & more 
fuller (n.)
"one who fulls cloth," Old English fullere "fuller" (Mark ix.3), from Latin fullo "fuller" (see foil (v.)). The native word is walker. Fuller's earth (silicate of alumina) is recorded by 1520s; so called because it was used in cleansing cloth.
Related entries & more