Etymology
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Visigoth 
1640s, from Late Latin Visigothus (plural Visigothi), perhaps "West Goths" (which could be Latinized from a Germanic source such as Old High German westan "from the west"), as opposed to Ostrogothi; but according to some authorities, Visi/Vesi appears to be a Latinized form of a tribal name. Their kingdom endured to 507 in southern France, till 711 in Spain. In common with Vandal their name later was used for "uncivilized person" (1749). Related: Visigothic.
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Ostrogoth (n.)

c. 1600 (Ostrogothes, plural, is attested from late 14c.), one of the "East Goths," the more easterly of the two great divisions of the Gothic tribe, who conquered Italy late 5c. and established, under Theodric, a kingdom there that lasted from 493 to 555 C.E., from Medieval Latin Ostrogothæ, from Germanic, perhaps literally "eastern Goths" from Proto-Germanic *austra- "east" (from PIE root *aus- (1) "to shine," on the notion of "toward sunrise"), but according to Klein's sources the first element might be literal: "shining" or "splendid." For second element, see Goth, and compare Visigoth. Related: Ostrogothic.

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