Etymology
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Vienna 

capital of Austria, Latin Vindobona, from Gaulish vindo- "white," from Celtic *vindo- (source also of Old Irish find, Welsh gwyn "white;" see Gwendolyn) + bona "foundation, fort." The "white" might be a reference to the river flowing through it. Related: Viennese.

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wiener (n.)

1900, shortening of wienerwurst (1874, American English), from German Wiener "of Vienna" (from Wien "Vienna," from Latin Vindo-bona; see Vienna) + Wurst "sausage" (see wurst). Colloquial wienie is attested by 1911. Extensive pejorative senses developed from its penis-like shape. Wiener roast is from 1910.

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logical (adj.)

early 15c., "based on reason, according to the principles of logic," from logic + -al (1). Meaning "pertaining to logic" is c. 1500. Attested from 1860 as "following as a reasonable consequence." Related: Logically. Logical positivism, in reference to the ideas of the Vienna Circle of philosophers, is from 1931.

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cerumen (n.)

"earwax," 1741, medical Latin cerumen, coined by Swiss anatomist Gaspard Bauhin (1560-1624) from Latin cera "wax" (see cero-); according to German sources [Hyrtl, "Onomatologia Anatomica," Vienna, 1880], he formed it on the model of bitumen. Related: Ceruminous.

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weenie (n.)

"frankfurter," 1906, with slang sense of "penis" following soon after, from German wienerwurst "Vienna sausage" (see wiener). Meaning "ineffectual person, effeminate young man" is slang from 1963; pejorative sense via penis shape, or perhaps from weenie in the sense of "small" (see wee).

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Prado (n.)

public park and promenade in Madrid, 1640s, Spanish, from Latin pratum "meadow" (see prairie). Compare Prater, name of a large park in Vienna, German, from Italian prato "meadow." French preau "little meadow" (formerly praël), Italian pratello are from Vulgar Latin *pratellum, diminutive of pratum.

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Scutum 

constellation, added 1687 by Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius, originally Scutum Sobiescanum "Shield of (King John) Sobeski," the 17c. Polish monarch famous as the savior of Christendom for his victory over the Ottomans at the Battle of Vienna (1683). The name was later shortened. From Latin scutum "shield" (see escutcheon). Middle English had scutifer "shield-bearer (late 14c.), from Medieval Latin.

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accordion (n.)

"small, keyed, bellows-like wind instrument," 1830, from German Akkordion, from Akkord "musical chord, concord of sounds," from a verb similar to Old French acorder "agree, be in harmony," from Vulgar Latin *accordare (compare Italian accordare "to attune a musical instrument;" see accord (v.)), with suffix on analogy of clarion, etc. Invented 1829 by piano-maker Cyrill Demian of Vienna. The type with a keyboard instead of buttons is a piano accordion. Related: Accordionist.

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schnitzel (n.)

veal cutlet (especially short for Wiener schnitzel, the style served in Vienna), 1854, from German Schnitzel "cutlet," literally "a slice," with -el, diminutive suffix + Schnitz "a cut, slice" from schnitzen "to carve," frequentative of schneiden "to cut," from Old High German snidan, from Proto-Germanic *sneithanan (source also of Old English sniþan, Middle Dutch sniden, Old Frisian snida, -snitha). This is sometimes said to be from a PIE root *sneit- "to cut," but Boutkan gives no IE etymology and has it as "Likely to be a North European substratum etymon."

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Gradus ad Parnassum (n.)

Latin, literally "A Step to Parnassus," the mountain sacred to Apollo and the Muses; from Latin gradus "a step; a step climbed; a step toward something" (from PIE root *ghredh- "to walk, go"). Also see Parnassus. It was the title of a dictionary of prosody used in English public schools for centuries as a guide to Roman poetry. The book dates from the 1680s. Also the name of a treatise on musical composition written in Latin by Johann Joseph Fux, published in Vienna in 1725, and of a much-used book of exercises for piano.

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