Etymology
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vexation (n.)

c. 1400, from Old French vexacion "abuse, harassment; insult, affront," or directly from Latin vexationem (nominative vexatio) "annoyance, harassing; distress, trouble," noun of action from past participle stem of vexare "to harass, trouble" (see vex).

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vexatious (adj.)

1530s; see vexation + -ous. Related: Vexatiously; vexatiousness.

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botheration (n.)

"annoyance, petty vexation," 1788, noun of action from bother (q.v.).

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annoying (adj.)

"troublesome, vexation, causing irritation," late 14c., present-participle adjective from annoy (v.). Related: Annoyingly.

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solicitation (n.)

late 15c., "management," from French solicitation and directly from Latin solicitationem (nominative solicitatio) "vexation, disturbance, instigation," noun of action from past-participle stem of solicitare "to disturb, rouse, stimulate, provoke"

(see solicit). Meaning "action of soliciting" is from 1520s. Specific sexual sense is from c. 1600.

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spite (v.)

c. 1400, "dislike, regard with ill will," from spite (n.). Meaning "treat maliciously" is from 1590s (as in "cut off (one's) nose to spite (one's) face"); earlier "fill with vexation, offend" (1560s). Related: Spited; spiting.

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provocation (n.)

c. 1400, provocacioun, "incitement, urging," from Old French provocacion (12c.) and directly from Latin provocationem (nominative provocatio) "a calling forth, a summoning, a challenge," noun of action from past-participle stem of provocare "to call out" (see provoke). Specifically "act of exciting anger or vexation" (early 15c.); the meaning "anything that excites anger, a cause of resentment" is by 1716.

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annoyance (n.)

late 14c., "vexation, trouble," from Old French enoiance "ill-humor, irritation," from anuiant, present participle of anuier "to be troublesome, annoy, harass" (see annoy). The meaning "state of being annoyed" is from c. 1500, as is the sense of "that which annoys." Earlier, annoying was used in the sense of "act of offending" (c. 1300) and a noun annoy (c. 1200) in the sense "feeling of irritation, displeasure, distaste."

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molest (v.)

late 14c., molesten, "to cause trouble, grief, or vexation, disturb, harass," from Old French molester "to torment, trouble, bother" (12c.) and directly from Latin molestare "to disturb, trouble, annoy," from molestus "troublesome, annoying, unmanageable," which is perhaps related to moles "mass" (see mole (n.3)) on notion of either "burden" or "barrier." Meaning "sexually assault" is attested by 1950. Related: Molested; molesting.

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molestation (n.)

c. 1400, molestacioun, "action of annoying or vexing," from Old French molestacion "vexation, harassing," and directly from Medieval Latin molestationem (nominative molestatio), noun of action from past participle stem of molestare (see molest). In Scottish law it meant "the harassing of a person in his possession or occupation of lands;" in English common law it came to mean "injury inflicted upon another."

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