Etymology
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Venice 
(Italian Venezia, German Venedig), from Medieval Latin Venetia, from Veneti (Greek Ouenetoi), name of an ancient people of Illyrian origin.
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Venezuela 
Spanish, diminutive of Venecia "Venice" (see Venice). Supposedly the name was given by Spanish sailors in 1499 when they saw a native village built on piles on Lake Maracaibo. Related: Venezuelan.
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Venetian (n.)
early 15c., "native or resident of Venice," from Medieval Latin Venetianus, from Venetia (see Venice). Also probably in part from Old French Venicien. As a kind of dress cloth, from 1710. As an adjective from 1550s. Venetian blinds, made of thin light slats suspended on strips of webbing, so called by 1791 (see blinds).
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Lido 
famous resort island off Venice, from Italian lido, from Latin litus "shore" (see littoral). Formerly used generically for public swimming places.
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Shylock (n.)
"usurer, merciless creditor," 1786, from Jewish money-lender character in Shakespeare's "The Merchant of Venice" (c. 1596).
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doge (n.)

"chief magistrate of the old republics of Venice and Genoa," 1540s, from Venetian dialect doge, from Latin ducem, accusative of dux "leader" (from PIE root *deuk- "to lead"). Related: Dogate; dogeship.

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carpaccio (n.)

"raw meat or fish served as an appetizer," 1975, from Italian, often connected to the name of Renaissance painter Vittore Carpaccio (c. 1460-1526) but without any plausible explanation except perhaps that his pictures often feature an orange-red hue reminiscent of some raw meat (and were the subject of a popular exhibit in Venice in 1963).

Giuseppe Cipriani, the owner of Harry's Bar [in Venice], claimed to have first served it around 1950 for a customer who demanded raw meat, but its name is not recorded in print before 1969 .... Over the decades the term has broadened out to cover any raw ingredient, including fish and even fruit, sliced thinly. [Ayto, "Diner's Dictionary"]
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lazaretto (n.)
"house for reception of lepers and diseased poor persons," 1540s, from Italian lazareto "place set aside for performance of quarantine" (especially that of Venice, which received many ships from plague-infested districts in the East), from the Biblical proper name Lazarus (q.v.). Meaning "building set apart for quarantine" is c. 1600 in English. The word in Italian was perhaps influenced by the name of another hospital in Venice, that associated with the church of Santa Maria di Nazaret. Sometimes Englished as lazaret; also known as lazar house (1520s).
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rialto (n.)

"an exchange, a mart," by 1869, a reference to the famous Ponte de Rialto of Venice and the market or exchange that stood on the east end of it and eventually expanded to cover the bridge itself. The name is contracted from Rivoalto and named for the canal (Latin rivus altus "deep stream") which it crosses.

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dobbin (n.)

common name of a work-horse or farm horse, 1596 (in "Merchant of Venice"), probably from diminutive form of Dob (early 13c.), the common Middle English familiar form of the masc. proper name Robin or Robert; the personal name being applied to a horse.

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