Etymology
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vena cava (n.)

Medical Latin, from Latin vena "vein" (see vein) + cava, from cavus "hollow" (from PIE root *keue- "to swell," also "vault, hole").

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metatarsal (adj.)

"of or pertaining to the metatarsus," 1739, from metatarsus "middle bones of the foot" (early 15c.), from Medieval Latin metatarsus, from meta "between, next after" (see meta-) + tarsus (see tarsus (n.)). As a noun, "a metatarsal bone," by 1854.

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venous (adj.)

1620s, from Latin venosus "full of veins," from vena (see vein).

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venule (n.)

"small vein," 1850, from Latin venula, diminutive of vena "vein" (see vein).

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venation (n.)

"arrangement of veins," 1640s, of plant structures, noun of state from Latin vena "vein" (see vein). Related: Venational.

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intravenous (adj.)

"in or occurring within a vein," 1847, from intra- "within, inside" + Latin venous, from vena "vein" (see vein). Related: Intravenously.

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metacarpus (n.)

"the middle bones of the hand," 1650s, Modern Latin, from Greek metakarpion, from meta "between; next after" (see meta-) + karpos "wrist" (see carpus). In humans, the part of the hand between the wrist and the fingers or thumb (corresponding to the metatarsus of the foot). Related: Metacarpal.

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vein (n.)

c. 1300, from Old French veine "vein, artery, pulse" (12c.), from Latin vena "a blood vessel," also "a water course, a vein of metal, a person's natural ability or interest," of unknown origin. The mining sense is attested in English from late 14c. (Greek phleps "vein" had the same secondary sense). Figurative sense of "strain or intermixture" (of some quality) is recorded from 1560s; that of "a humor or mood, natural tendency" is first recorded 1570s.

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