Etymology
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utterance (n.)
"that which is uttered," c. 1400, from utter (v.) + -ance.
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mumble (n.)

"a low, indistinct utterance," 1902, from mumble (v.).

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drawl (n.)

"slow, unanimated manner of utterance," 1760, from drawl (v.).

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swearing (n.)
"utterance of profane language," mid-14c., verbal noun from swear (v.).
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om 

1788, mystical word or combination of letters in Hindu religions and Buddhism; originally an utterance of assent.

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elocution (n.)

mid-15c., elocucioun, "oratorical or literary style," from Late Latin elocutionem (nominative elocutio) "voice production, a speaking out, utterance, manner of expression," in classical Latin especially "rhetorical utterance, oratorical expression," noun of action from past-participle stem of eloqui "to speak out," from ex "out" (see ex-) + loqui "to speak" (from PIE root *tolkw- "to speak"). Related: Elocutionary; elocutionist.

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univocal (adj.)
1540s, "having one meaning only," from Latin univocus, from uni- (see uni-) + vox "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak"). Related: Univocally.
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phone (n.2)

"elementary sound of a spoken language, one of the primary elements of utterance," 1866, from Greek phōnē "sound, voice" (from PIE root *bha- (2) "to speak, tell, say").

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vaunt (n.)
"boasting utterance," c. 1400, short for avaunt "a boast" (late 14c.), from avaunten "to boast" (c. 1300), from Old French avanter "boast about, boast of, glory in."
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sotto voce 

1737, Italian, literally "under voice," from sotto, from Latin subtus "below" (source also of French sous; see sub-) + voce, from Latin vocem (nominative vox) "voice, sound, utterance" (from PIE root *wekw- "to speak").

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