Etymology
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utter (adj.)
Old English utera, uterra, "outer, exterior, external," from Proto-Germanic *utizon (source also of Old Norse utar, Old Frisian uttra, Middle Dutch utere, Dutch uiter-, Old High German uzar, German äußer "outer"), comparative adjective from ut (see out (adv.)). Meaning "complete, total" (i.e. "going to the utmost point") is from early 15c.
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utter (v.)
"speak, say," c. 1400, in part from Middle Dutch uteren or Middle Low German utern "to turn out, show, speak," from uter "outer," comparative adjective from ut "out" (see utter (adj.)); in part from Middle English verb outen "to disclose," from Old English utan "to put out," from ut (see out (v.)). Compare German äussern "to utter, express," from aus "out;" and colloquial phrase out with it "speak up!" Formerly also used as a commercial verb (as release is now). Related: Uttered; uttering.
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utterance (n.)
"that which is uttered," c. 1400, from utter (v.) + -ance.
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utterly (adv.)
early 13c., "truly, plainly, outspokenly," from utter (v.) + -ly (1); meaning "to an absolute degree" is late 14c., from utter (adj.)). Cf similarly formed German äusserlich. Old English uterlic (adj.) meant "external."
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unutterable (adj.)
1580s, from un- (1) "not" + utterable (see utter (v.)). As a noun, from 1788; unutterables as a euphemism for "trousers" is recorded by 1826 (see inexpressible).
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uttermost (adj.)

late 14c., from utter (adj.) + -most. More recent than utmost. Compare utmost. Middle English had also uttermore (late 14c.), now, alas, no longer with us.

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outer (adj.)

"that is farther out, that is exterior or external; of or pertaining to the outside; further removed," late 14c., comparative of out (on analogy of inner), replacing by 18c. forms descended from Old English uttera (comparative of Old English ut "out") which developed into utter (adj.) and was no longer felt as connected with out. Outer space "region beyond the earth's atmosphere" is attested from 1845.

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profer (v.)

c. 1300, proferen, "to utter, express," from Old French proferer (13c.) "utter, present verbally, pronounce" and directly from Latin proferre "to bring forth, produce," figuratively "make known, publish, quote, utter." The sense is confused with proffer, and the word now is archaic or obsolete. Related: Profered; profering.

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word (v.)
c. 1200, "to utter;" 1610s, "put into words," from word (n.). Related: Worded; wording.
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clamor (v.)

"utter loudly, shout," also figurative, "make importunate demands or complaints," late 14c., from clamor (n.). Related: Clamored; clamoring.

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