Etymology
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urination (n.)
early 15c., from Medieval Latin urinationem (nominative urinatio), noun of action from past participle stem of urinare (v.), from urina (see urine.
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urinate (v.)
1590s, back-formation from urination or else from Medieval Latin urinatus, past participle of urinare, from urina (see urine). Related: Urinated; urinating.
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diuretic 

as an adjective, "inducing or promoting urination;" as a noun, "medicine that promotes urination;" c. 1400 diuretik (adjective and noun), from Old French diuretique, from Late Latin diureticus, from Greek diouretikos "prompting urine," from diourein "urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine).

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bed-wetting (n.)
"involuntary urination while sleeping," 1844, from bed (n.) + present participle of wet (v.). Related: Bed-wetter.
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anuria (n.)
"absence of urination," 1838, medical Latin, from Greek an- "not, without" (see an- (1)) + ouron "urine" (see urine) + abstract noun ending -ia.
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pee (v.)

1788, "to spray with urine" (trans.), euphemistic abbreviation of piss. Meaning "to urinate" is from 1879. Related: Peed; peeing. Noun meaning "act of urination" is attested by 1902; as "urine" by 1961. Reduplicated form pee-pee is attested by 1923.

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leak (n.)
"hole by which liquid enters or escapes," late 15c., from leak (v.) or Old Norse cognate leka. Sense of "revelation of secret information" is from 1950. Meaning "act of urination" is attested from 1934 ("Tropic of Cancer"); but the verb meaning "to piss" is from 1590s: "Why, you will allow vs ne're a Iourden [i.e. a chamberpot], and then we leake in your Chimney." ["I Hen. IV," II.i.22]
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number (n.)

c. 1300, "sum, aggregate of a collection," from Anglo-French noumbre, Old French nombre and directly from Latin numerus "a number, quantity," from PIE root *nem- "assign, allot; take."

Meaning "written symbol or figure of arithmetic value" is from late 14c. Meaning "single (numbered) issue of a magazine" is from 1795. Colloquial sense of "a person or thing" is by 1894. Meaning "dialing combination to reach a particular telephone receiver" is from 1879; hence wrong number (1886). The modern meaning "musical selection" (1885) is from vaudeville theater programs, where acts were marked by a number. Earlier numbers meant "metrical sound or utterance, measured or harmonic expression" (late 15c.) and, from 1580s, "poetical measure, poetry, verse."

Number one "oneself" is from 1704 (mock-Italian form numero uno attested from 1973); the biblical Book of Numbers (c. 1400, Latin Numeri, Greek Arithmoi) is so called because it begins with a census of the Israelites. Childish slang number one and number two for "urination" and "defecation" attested from 1902. Number cruncher is 1966, of machines; 1971 of persons. To get or have (someone's) number "have someone figured out" is attested from 1853; to say one's number is up (1806) meaning "one's time has come" is a reference to the numbers on a lottery, draft, etc. The numbers "illegal lottery" is from 1897, American English.

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