Etymology
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urinate (v.)
1590s, back-formation from urination or else from Medieval Latin urinatus, past participle of urinare, from urina (see urine). Related: Urinated; urinating.
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*meigh- 

Proto-Indo-European root meaning "to urinate." 

It forms all or part of: micturate; micturition; missel; mist; mistletoe.

It is the hypothetical source of/evidence for its existence is provided by: Sanskrit mehati "urinates;" Avestan maezaiti "urinates;" Greek omeikhein "to urinate;" Latin mingere "to urinate;" Armenian mizem "urinate;" Lithuanian minžu, minžti "urinate;" Old English migan "to urinate," micga "urine," meox "dung, filth."

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enuresis (n.)
minor urinary incontinence, 1800, medical Latin, from Greek enourein "to urinate in," from en "in" (see en- (2)) + ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine).
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diuresis (n.)

"excessive secretion of urine," 1680s, medical Latin, from Greek diourein "to urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine) + -esis.

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micturition (n.)

1725, "the need very badly to urinate," from Latin micturitum, from past participle of micturire "to desire to urinate," desiderative of mingere "to urinate," from PIE root *meigh- "to urinate." As during the final 20 minutes of a 4-hour film after drinking a 32-ounce Mountain Dew from the snack bar and the movie ends with a drawn-out farewell scene while Frodo is standing on the pier and wavelets lap audibly on the dock the whole time as if the director was a sadist set on compounding your torment. Also used, incorrectly, for "act of urinating."

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micturate (v.)

"urinate," by 1835, from micturition; malformed and with an erroneous sense; condemned from its birth.

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diuretic 

as an adjective, "inducing or promoting urination;" as a noun, "medicine that promotes urination;" c. 1400 diuretik (adjective and noun), from Old French diuretique, from Late Latin diureticus, from Greek diouretikos "prompting urine," from diourein "urinate," from dia "through" (see dia-) + ourein "urinate," from ouron (see urine).

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ureter (n.)
1570s, from medical Latin ureter, from Greek oureter "urinary duct of the kidneys," from ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine). Related: Ureteral.
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whizz (v.)
"make or move with a humming, hissing sound," 1540s, of imitative origin. Meaning "to urinate" is from 1929. Related: Whizzed; whizzing. The noun is recorded from 1610s. Whizzer "something extraordinary" is from 1888.
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urethra (n.)
"canal through which urine is discharged from the bladder," 1630s, from Late Latin urethra, from Greek ourethra "the passage for urine," coined by Hippocrates from ourein "to urinate," from ouron (see urine). Related: Urethral.
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