Etymology
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upset (v.)
mid-15c., "to set up, fix," from up (adv.) + set (v.). Similar formation in Middle Dutch opsetten "set up, propose," German aufsetzen. Modern sense of "overturn, capsize" (1803) is that of obsolete overset. In reference to the stomach, from 1834. Meaning "to throw into mental discomposure" is from 1805. Related: Upsetting.
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upset (n.)
early 15c., "insurrection," from upset (v.). Meaning "overturning of a vehicle or boat" is recorded from 1804.
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upset (adj.)
early 14c., "erected," past-participle adjective from upset (v.). From 1805 as "distressed."
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distemper (v.)

late 14c., distemperen, "to disturb, upset the proper balance of," from Old French destemprer and directly from Medieval Latin distemperare "vex, make ill," literally "upset the proper balance (of bodily humors)," from dis- "un-, not" (see dis-) + Latin temperare "mingle in the proper proportion" (see temper (v.)). Related: Distempered.

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discombobulate (v.)

"to upset, embarrass," 1834, discombobricate, American English, fanciful mock-Latin coinage of a type popular then. Compare, on a similar pattern, confusticate (1852), absquatulate (1840), spifflicate "confound, beat" (1850), scrumplicate "eat" (1890). Related: discombobulating; discombobulation.

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ticklish (adj.)

1580s, "easy to upset," 1580s, a figurative use, from tickle + -ish. The literal sense of "easily tickled" is from 1590s, as is the other figurative sense, "difficult to do, dubious, requiring great care." An earlier word was tickly (1520s). Related: Ticklishly; ticklishness.

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inverse (adj.)

"turned in the opposite direction, having an opposite course or tendency," in early use also enverse, mid-15c., from Latin inversus, past participle of invertere "turn about, turn upside-down, upset, reverse, invert" (see invert). Related: Inversely. As a noun, "inverted state or condition," 1680s, from the adjective.

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invert (v.)

"to turn (something) in an opposite direction; reverse the position, order, or sequence of," 1530s, from French invertir or directly from Latin invertere "turn upside down, turn about; upset, reverse, transpose," figuratively "pervert, corrupt, misrepresent," of words, "to use ironically," from in- "in, on" (from PIE root *en "in") + vertere "to turn" (from PIE root *wer- (2) "to turn, bend"). Related: Inverted; inverting; invertedly.

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put-out (adj.)

"offended, angry, upset," by 1887, from the verbal phrase in the sense of "offend," attested by 1822; see put (v.) + out (adv.). Perhaps via the earlier sense of "cause to lose self-possession, disconcert" (1580s). The verbal phrase is from mid-14c. as "drive out, banish, exile;" from 1520s as "extinguish" (a fire or burning object). To put out, of a woman, "to offer oneself for sex" is attested by 1947.

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capsize (v.)

1758, intransitive, "to tip or turn over;" 1769, transitive, "to turn (a vessel) over, cause to overturn, turn (anything) topsy-turvy;" a nautical word of obscure origin, perhaps (as Skeat suggests) from Spanish capuzar "to sink by the head," from cabo "head," from Latin caput "head" (from PIE root *kaput- "head"). For sense, compare French chavirer "to capsize, upset," faire capot "capsize;" Provençal cap virar "to turn the head." Related: Capsized; capsizing.

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