Etymology
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upright (adj.)

Old English upriht "erect, face-upward;" see up (adv.) + right (adj.1). Similar compounds are found in other Germanic languages (Old Frisian upriucht, Middle Dutch oprecht, Old High German ufreht, German aufrecht, Old Norse uprettr). Figurative sense of "good, honest, adhering to rectitude" is first attested 1520s.

As an adverb, Old English uprihte. As a noun, 1560s in the sense "a vertical front;" c. 1700 as "a vertical timber in framing;" 1742 in the sense "something standing erect." Meaning "an upright piano" is from 1860.

THREE-PENNY UPRIGHT. A retailer of love, who, for the sum mentioned, dispenses her favours standing against a wall. ["Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue," 1811]
The bent-over rear-entry posture they are talking about, of course, is kubda, the three-obol position at the bottom-end of a prostitute's price-range. [James N. Davidson, "Courtesans and Fishcakes: The Consuming Passions of Classical Athens," 1997]
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stand-pipe (n.)
"upright pipe," in various technical senses, 1810, from stand (v.) + pipe (n.).
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stanchion (n.)

early 14c., "post, pillar, or beam used for support," from Old French estanchon "prop, brace, support" (13c., Modern French étançon), probably from estant "upright," from present participle of ester "be upright, stand," from Latin stare "to stand" (from PIE root *sta- "to stand, make or be firm").

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headstone (n.)
c. 1400, "cornerstone," from head (adj.) + stone (n.). Meaning "upright stone at the head of a grave" is 1775, from head (n.).
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rightable (adj.)

"capable of being set right or again made upright," by 1891, from right (v.) + -able.

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erect (adj.)
late 14c., "upright, not bending," from Latin erectus "upright, elevated, lofty; eager, alert, aroused; resolute; arrogant," past participle of erigere "raise or set up," from e- "up, out of" + regere "to direct, keep straight, guide" (from PIE root *reg- "move in a straight line," with derivatives meaning "to direct in a straight line," thus "to lead, rule").
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club-moss (n.)

1590s, from club (n.) + moss. So called for the club shape of its upright spore-cases.

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candlestick (n.)

also candle-stick, "utensil for holding a candle," Old English candelsticca; see candle + stick (n.). From 1915 in reference to a type of upright telephone common from 1890s to 1940s.

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drift-net (n.)

"gill net, held upright in water by floats and extended by weights below, that drifts with the tides," 1660s, from drift (v.) + net (n.).

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kickstand (n.)
also kick-stand, "metal support for holding a bicycle upright," 1936, from kick (n.) + stand (n.). So called for the method of putting it in position.
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