Etymology
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unjust (adj.)

late 14c., of persons, "sinful; perpetrating injustice," from un- (1) "not" + just (adj.). Of actions, from c. 1400. Related: Unjustly.

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injustice (n.)

late 14c., from Old French injustice "unfairness, injustice" (14c.), from Latin iniustitia "unfairness, injustice," from iniustus "unjust, wrongful, unreasonable, improper, oppressive," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + iustus "just" (see just (adj.)). Injust (adj.) is attested from late 15c., from French, but unjust is the usual English word.

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wrong (n.)

"that which is improper or unjust," late Old English, from wrong (adj.). Meaning "an unjust action" is recorded from c. 1200. Wrong-doer is from late 14c.

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iniquitous (adj.)

"unjust wicked," 1670s, from iniquity + -ous. Earlier were iniquous (1650s, from Latin iniquus) and inique (1520s, from French inique). Related: Iniquitously; iniquitousness.

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tyranny (n.)

late 14c., "cruel or unjust use of power; the government of a tyrant," from Old French tyranie (13c.), from Late Latin tyrannia "tyranny," from Greek tyrannia "rule of a tyrant, absolute power," from tyrannos "master" (see tyrant).

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one-sided (adj.)

1833, "dealing with one side only of a question or dispute," hence, "partial, unjust, unfair," from one + side (n.). Translating German ein-seitiger. Related: One-sidedly; one-sidedness.

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injurious (adj.)

early 15c., "abusive," from Old French injurios "unjust; harmful" (14c., Modern French injurieux) and directly from Latin iniuriosus "unlawful, acting unjustly, wrongful, harmful," from iniuria "injustice, unlawful violence, insult" (see injury). Related: Injuriously; injuriousness.

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partiality (n.)

"one-sidedness, unjust or unreasonable preference for one party in a dispute or transaction," early 15c., parcialte, from Old French parcialite and directly from Medieval Latin partialitatem (nominative partialitas), from partialis "divisible; partial" (see partial).

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unequal (adj.)

1530s, "unjust, unfair," from un- (1) "not" + equal (adj.). Meaning "not the same in amount, size, quality, etc." is recorded from 1560s (inequal in this sense is from late 14c.). Sense of "inadequate, insufficient" (to some task) is attested from 1690s. Related: Unequally.

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unfair (adj.)

Old English unfægr "unlovely, not beautiful, deformed, hideous, unlovable," from un- (1) "not" + fair (adj.). Similar formation in Old Norse ufagr, Gothic unfagrs. Meaning "wicked, evil, bad" is recorded from c. 1300. Sense of "not equitable, unjust" is first recorded 1713. Related: Unfairly.

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