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united states (n.)
attested from 1617, originally with reference to Holland; the North American confederation first so called in 1776. United Provinces were the seven northern provinces of the Netherlands, allied from 1579, later developing into the kingdom of Holland.
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navy (n.)

mid-14c., navie, "fleet of ships," especially for purposes of war, from Old French navie "fleet; ship," from Latin navigia, plural of navigium "vessel, boat," from navis "ship," from PIE root *nau- "boat."

Meaning "a nation's collective, organized sea power" is from 1530s. The Old English words were sciphere (usually of Viking invaders) and scipfierd (usually of the home defenses). Navy blue was the color of the British naval uniform. Navy bean attested from 1856, so called because they were grown to be used by the Navy. Navy-yard "government dockyard," in the U.S. "a dockyard where government ships are built or repaired" is by 1842.

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united (adj.)
"made into one," 1550s, past-participle adjective from unite (v.).
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United Nations 

1942, "the Allied nations at war with the Axis powers;" the international body (officially the United Nations Organization) was chartered in 1945.

Such negotiation as may occur in New York is not conducted within the walls of the tall building by the East River: it is carried out elsewhere, in accordance with those principles of courtesy, confidence and discretion which must for ever remain the only principles conducive to the peaceful settlement of disputes. [Harold Nicholson, "The Evolution of Diplomatic Method," 1954]
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US 
also U.S., abbreviation of United States, attested from 1834. U.S.A. for "United States of America" is recorded from 1885; before that it generally meant "U.S. Army."
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non-intercourse (n.)

"a refraining from intercourse," in any sense, 1809, from non- + intercourse.

Non-Intercourse Act, an act of the United States Congress of 1809 passed in retaliation for claims made by France and Great Britain affecting the commerce of the United States, and particularly the personal rights of United States seamen, continued 1809 and 1810, and against Great Britain 1811. It prohibited the entry of merchant vessels belonging to those countries into the ports of the United States, and the importation of goods grown or manufactured in those countries. [Century Dictionary]
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USA 
also U.S.A., abbreviation of United States of America, in use by 1814 in addresses, etc.; not common otherwise before c. 1920. Before then it often also meant United States Army.
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stateside (adj.)
also state-side, 1944, World War II U.S. military slang, from the States "United States" (see state (n.2)) + side.
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FBI 
U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation, formed 1935 from the former United States Bureau of Investigation (1908).
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