Etymology
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uniformity (n.)

early 15c., from Old French uniformite (14c.) or directly from Late Latin uniformitatem (nominative uniformitas) "uniformity," from Latin uniformis (see uniform (adj.)).

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uniformitarian (n.)

1840 in geology, from uniformity + -arian. Related: Uniformitarianism (1865).

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unitary (adj.)

1847, "characterized by unity or uniformity;" 1865, "of or relating to a unit;" see unit + -ary.

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equability (n.)

1530s, from Latin aequabilitatem (nominative aequabilitas) "equality, uniformity, evenness," figuratively "impartiality," from aequabilis "equal, consistent, uniform" (see equable).

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evenly (adv.)

Old English efenlice "evenly, equally;" see even (adj.) + -ly (2). Meaning "so as to produce uniformity of texture is early 15c.; that of "without surface irregularities, smoothly" is from 1630s.

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homogeny (n.)

1620s, "uniformity of nature;" by 1856 in biological sense "descent from a common ancestor," from Greek homogeneia "community of origin," from homogene "of the same race or kind" (see homogeneous).

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oneness (n.)

1590s, "quality of being just one, unity, union;" 1610s, "sameness, uniformity," from one + -ness. The modern word appears to be a re-formation; Middle English onnesse (Old English annes "unity, agreement, solitude") vanished after 1400.

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measured (adj.)

late 14c., "moderate, temperate" (a sense now obsolete), past-participle adjective from measure (v.) in the sense of "exercise moderation." Meaning "uniform, regular, characterized by uniformity of movement or rhythm" is from c. 1400. That of "ascertained or determined by measuring" is from mid-15c. Meaning "deliberate, restrained" is from 1802.

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monotony (n.)

1706, originally in transferred sense of "wearisome sameness, tiresome uniformity or lack of variation," from French monotonie (1670s), from Greek monotonia "sameness of tone, monotony," from monotonos "of one and the same tone," from monos "single, alone" (from PIE root *men- (4) "small, isolated") + tonos "tone," from PIE root *ten- "to stretch." Literal sense of "sameness of tone or pitch" is attested in English from 1724.

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nonconformist (n.)

also non-conformist, "one who does not conform to some law or usage," 1610s, originally and especially of clergymen who adhered to Church of England doctrine but not its practice, from non- + conformist. After their ejection under the Act of Uniformity (1662) the name passed to the separate churches they joined or formed. In general use from 1670s as "one who does not participate in a practice or course of action." As an adjective from 1640s. Shortened form non-con is attested from 1680s.

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