Etymology
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unify (v.)

c. 1500, "to make into one," from French unifier (14c.) or directly from Late Latin unificare "make one," from Latin uni- "one" (see uni-) + combining form of facere "to make" (from PIE root *dhe- "to set, put"). Related: Unified; unifying. Unified (field) theory in physics is recorded from 1935.

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together (adv.)
Old English togædere "so as to be present in one place, in a group, in an accumulated mass," from to (see to) + gædere "together" (adv.), apparently a variant of the adverb geador "together," from Proto-Germanic *gaduri- "in a body," from PIE *ghedh- "to unite, join, fit" (see good, and compare gather).

In reference to single things, "so as to be unified or integrated," from c. 1300. Adjective meaning "self-assured, free of emotional difficulties" is first recorded 1966. German cognate zusammen has as second element the Old High German verbal cognate of English same (Old English also had tosamne "together").
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