Etymology
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unhappy (adj.)
c. 1300, "causing misfortune or trouble (to oneself or others)," from un- (1) "not" + happy. Meaning "unfortunate, unlucky" is recorded from late 14c.; sense of "miserable, wretched" is recorded from late 14c. (originally via misfortune or mishap).
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unhappiness (n.)
late 15c., "misfortune," from unhappy + -ness. Meaning "mental misery" is from 1722.
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unhappily (adv.)
late 14c., "unfortunately, unluckily;" early 15c., "wretchedly, without happiness," from un- (i) "not" + happily, or from unhappy + -ly (2.). Similar formation in Old Norse unheppiliga.
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mirthless (adj.)

"joyless, without mirth, unhappy," late 14c., from mirth + -less. Related: Mirthlessly.

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infelicitous (adj.)
"unhappy, unlucky," 1754, from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + felicitous. Earlier was infelicious (1590s). Related: infelicitously; infelicitousness.
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tragedy (n.)

late 14c., "play or other serious literary work with an unhappy ending," from Old French tragedie (14c.), from Latin tragedia "a tragedy," from Greek tragodia "a dramatic poem or play in formal language and having an unhappy resolution," apparently literally "goat song," from tragos "goat, buck" + ōidē "song" (see ode), probably on model of rhapsodos (see rhapsody).

The connection may be via satyric drama, from which tragedy later developed, in which actors or singers were dressed in goatskins to represent satyrs. But many other theories have been made (including "singer who competes for a goat as a prize"), and even the "goat" connection is at times questioned. Meaning "any unhappy event, disaster" is from c. 1500.

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hospitalize (v.)
1873, from hospital + -ize. "Freq[uently] commented on as an unhappy formation" [OED]. As verbs, hospitate is recorded from 1620s as "to lodge or entertain, receive with hospitality" but is rare; hospitize is from 1895. Related: hospitalized; hospitalizing.
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miserable (adj.)

early 15c., "full of misery, causing wretchedness" (of conditions), from Old French miserable (14c.) and directly from Latin miserabilis "pitiable, miserable, deplorable, lamentable," from miserari "to pity, lament, deplore," from miser "wretched" (see miser). Of persons, "existing in a state of want, suffering, wretchedness, etc.," it is attested from 1520s. Meaning "mentally full of misery, wretched in feeling unhappy," by 1590s. Related: Miserableness.

The sense associated with miser, "covetous, miserly," is attested from late 15c., but by 1895 (Century Dictionary) was "obsolete or Scotch." As a noun, "an unfortunate, an unhappy creature," 1530s (reinforced later by the French cognate, as in Hugo's "Les Misérables").

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infelicity (n.)
late 14c., "unhappiness," from Latin infelicitas "bad luck, misfortune, unhappiness," from infelix (genitive infelicis) "unfruitful, barren; unfortunate, unhappy; causing misfortune, unlucky," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + felix "happy" (see felicity). Meaning "inappropriateness, unhappiness as to occasion" is from 1610s.
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unmerited (adj.)

1640s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of merit (v.).

"An ingenuous mind feels in unmerited praise the bitterest reproof. If you reject it you are unhappy, if you accept it you are undone." [Walter Savage Landor, "Imaginary Conversations"]
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