Etymology
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undress (v.)
1590s, "to shed one's clothing," from un- (2) "opposite of" + dress (v.). Transitive sense of "to strip off (someone's) clothing" is recorded from 1610s. Related: Undressed; undressing.
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undress (n.)
"state of partial or incomplete dress," 1680s, from undress (v.). Meaning "ordinary dress" is from 1748.
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undressed (adj.)
"naked (or nearly so)," 1610s, past-participle adjective from undress (v.).
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dishabille (n.)

"undress or negligent dress," especially "a loose morning dress," 1670s, from French déshabillé (17c.), noun use of past participle of déshabiller "to undress" (oneself), from des- (see dis-) + habiller "to dress," originally "prepare, arrange," from Latin habitus "condition, demeanor, appearance, dress," originally past participle of habere "to have, hold, possess; wear; find oneself, be situated; consider, think, reason, have in mind; manage, keep," from PIE root *ghabh- "to give or receive."

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disrobe (v.)

"to undress (oneself);" also, transitive, "divest of a robe or garments, denude;" 1580s; see dis- + robe. Perhaps from or based on Old French desrober (Modern French dérober). Related: Disrobed; disrobing.

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apodyterium (n.)
"undressing room" (in a Greek or Roman bath house or palaestra), 1690s, from Latin apodyterium, from Greek apodyterion "undressing room," from apodyein "to put off, undress," from apo "off" (see apo-) + dyein "to put on, enter, go in" (see ecdysiast).
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pin-up (adj.)

1670s, of clothing, "adapted for being pinned up," from the verbal phrase (attested from mid-15c. in the sense "affix in a prominent place"), from pin (v.) + up (adv.). From 1940, in reference to pictures of "winsome young ladies in daring undress" ("Life," May 6, 1940) such as soldiers pinned up on their dugout walls, etc. The thing itself is older than the name. The noun in this sense is recorded from 1943.

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lap (n.1)

Old English læppa (plural læppan) "skirt or flap of a garment," from Proto-Germanic *lapp- (source also of Old Frisian lappa, Old Saxon lappo, Middle Dutch lappe, Dutch lap, Old High German lappa, German Lappen "rag, shred," Old Norse leppr "patch, rag"), of uncertain origin.

Sense of "lower front part of a shirt or skirt" led to that of "upper legs of seated person" (c. 1300). Used figuratively ("bosom, breast, place where someone or something is held and cherished") from late 14c., as in lap of luxury (which is first recorded 1802). To drop or dump something in someone's lap "shift a burden" is from 1962. From 15c.-17c. the word (often in plural) was a euphemism for "female pudendum," but this is not the source of lap dance, which is first recorded 1993.

To lap dance, you undress, sit your client down, order him to stay still and fully clothed, then hover over him, making a motion that you have perfected by watching Mister Softee ice cream dispensers. [Anthony Lane, review of "Showgirls," New Yorker, Oct. 16, 1995]

Lap-clap was old slang for "an act of coition" (c. 1600), in warning expressions to youth often paired with lip-clip "a kiss." Also compare slang Lapland "the society of women."

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