Etymology
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unconditioned (adj.)
1630s, from un- (1) "not" + past participle of condition (v.).
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reflex (n.)

c. 1500, "reflection of light, image produced by reflection," from a verb reflex meaning "refract, deflect" (late 14c.; compare reflect), from Late Latin reflexus "a bending back," noun use of past participle of reflectere "to bend back, bend backwards, turn away," from re- "back" (see re-) + flectere "to bend" (see flexible). Also as an adjective (1640s), "thrown or turned backward," also of thoughts or the mind. Meaning "involuntary nerve stimulation" is recorded by 1877, short for reflex action (1833) "simple, involuntary action of the nervous system."

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reflexology (n.)

1927, as a psychological theory, from German reflexologie (1912); see reflex + -ology. As a foot massage technique for releasing nervous tension, recorded by 1976.

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knee-jerk (n.)
patellar reflex, a neurological phenomenon discovered and named in 1876; see knee (n.) + jerk (n.1) in the medical sense. The figurative use appeared soon after the phrase was coined.
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reflexive (adj.)

1580s, "reflective, capable of bending or turning back," from Medieval Latin reflexivus, from Late Latin reflexus (see reflect). Meaning "of the nature of a reflex" is from 1839 (implied in reflexively). Grammatical sense, in reference to verbs especially, "turning the action back upon the subject," is by 1740. Related: Reflexiveness; reflexivity.

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