Etymology
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unable (adj.)

late 14c., "lacking in ability, incapable," from un- (1) "not" + able (adj.). Modeled on Old French inhabile or Latin inhabilis.

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incontinent (adj.)

late 14c., "wanting self-restraint," from Old French incontinent (14c.) or directly from Latin incontinentem (nominative incontinens) "immoderate, intemperate, not holding back," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + continens (see continent (adj.)).

Originally chiefly of sexual appetites. General sense of "unable to retain" is from 1640s; medical sense of "unable to control bowels or bladder, unable to restrain natural discharges from the body" is attested by 1828.

He was incontynent, and with fleschely lustes he consumyd alle his tyme. ["Speculum Sacerdotale," 15th century]
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helpless (adj.)

"unable to act for oneself," c. 1200, from help (n.) + -less. Related: Helplessly; helplessness. In Middle English and later sometimes "unable to give help, affording no help" (late 14c.), but this never was common.

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unresponsive (adj.)

1660s, "unable to reply," from un- (1) "not" + responsive (adj.). Meaning "not responding" is from 1775. Related: Unresponsiveness.

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disable (v.)

"render unable, weaken or destroy the capability of," late 15c., from dis- "do the opposite of" + ablen (v.) "to make fit" (see able). Related: Disabled; disabling. Earlier in the same sense was unable (v.) "make unfit, render unsuitable" (c. 1400).

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uncomparable (adj.)

late 14c., "incomparable," from un- (1) "not" + comparable. Meaning "unable to be compared (to something else)" is from 1826. Related: Uncomparably.

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leaky (adj.)

mid-15c., from leak (n.) + -y (2). Related: Leakiness. Slang sense of "unable to keep a secret" attested from 1704.

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ruff (v.)

in cards, "trump when unable to follow suit," 1760, from the card game ruff (see ruff (n.2)). Related: Ruffed; ruffing.

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stuck (adj.)

"unable to go any farther," 1885, past-participle adjective from stick (v.). Colloquial stuck-up "offensively conceited, assuming an unjustified air of superiority" is recorded from 1829.

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behindhand (adv., adj.)

"in the rear, in a backward state," especially "insolvent, unable to pay," 1520s, from prepositional phrase; see behind, probably on model of beforehand (q.v.).

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