Etymology
Advertisement
font (n.2)

"complete set of characters of a particular face and size of printing type," 1680s (also fount); earlier "a casting" (1570s); from French fonte "a casting," noun use of fem. past participle of fondre "to melt," from Latin fundere (past participle fusus) "to melt, cast, pour out" (from nasalized form of PIE root *gheu- "to pour"). So called because all the letters in a given set were cast at the same time.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
font (n.1)

"water basin," especially used in baptism, late Old English, from Latin fons (genitive fontis) "fountain" (see fountain), especially in Medieval Latin fons baptismalis "baptismal font." The word is sometimes used poetically for "a fountain; a source."

Related entries & more 
typewriter (n.)

in the mechanical sense, 1868, from type (n.) + writer. Related: Type-write (v.) "print by means of a typewriter;" type-written (1882). Slang office-piano "typewriter" is by 1942.

It is the advantage of the typewriter that, due to its rigidity and its space precisions, it can, for a poet, indicate exactly the breath, the pauses, the suspensions even of syllables, the juxtapositions even of parts of phrases, which he intends. For the first time the poet has the stave and the bar a musician has had. For the first time he can, without the convention of rime and meter, record the listening he has done to his own speech and by that one act indicate how he would want any reader, silently or otherwise, to voice his work. [Charles Olson, "Projective Verse," 1950]
Related entries & more 
typeface (n.)

also type-face, 1852, "top of a type," from type (n.) in the printing sense + face (n.). In modern common usage, synonymous with font (n.2), but there is a technical distinction: the typeface is the set of characters of the same design; the font is the physical (or electronic) means of producing them.

Related entries & more 
Selectric (n.)

proprietary name (IBM) of a popular type of advanced electric typewriter, 1961, from select (v.) + electric.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
teletype (n.)

1904, trademark for a system of typewriters connected electronically, short for teletypewriter (1904), a form of telegraph in which the receiver prints messages like a typewriter, from tele- + typewriter.

Related entries & more 
spacer (n.)

typewriter mechanism and key, 1882, agent noun from space (v.).

Related entries & more 
fount (n.)

"spring of water," 1590s, probably a shortening of fountain influenced by French font "fount." Figurative use also is from 1590s.

Related entries & more 
typist (n.)

1843, "compositor," from type (n.) + -ist. Meaning "person who operates a typewriter" is from 1884.

Related entries & more 
retype (v.)

also re-type, 1898, "copy with a typewriter," from re- "again" + type (v.). Related: Retyped; retyping.

Related entries & more