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trusty (adj.)
early 13c., "trusting," from trust (n.) + -y (2). Old English expressed this idea by treowful. Meaning "reliable, to be counted on" is from early 14c. The noun meaning "trustworthy person" is from 1570s; specifically as "a prisoner granted special privileges as reward for good conduct" by 1855.
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Truman 
surname, attested by 1215, literally "faithful man, trusty man."
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tried (adj.)
"tested, proven, trusty," mid-14c., past-participle adjective from try (v.). Coupled since mid-14c. with true.
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confidant (n.)

1610s, confident, "(male) person trusted with private affairs," from French confident (16c.), from Italian confidente "a trusty friend," literally "confident, trusty," from Latin confidentem (nominative confidens), present participle of confidere "to trust, confide," from assimilated form of com, here perhaps an intensive prefix (see com-), + fidere "to trust" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). The spelling with -a- and the pronunciation with the stress on the last syllable came to predominate 18c. and might reflect the French pronunciation.

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trig (adj.)
"smart, trim," c. 1200, from Old Norse tryggr "firm, trusty, true," from Proto-Germanic *treuwaz "having or characterized by good faith," from PIE *drew-o-, a suffixed form of the root *deru- "be firm, solid, steadfast." A Scottish and northern word only until 19c. Related: Trigness.
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firm (n.)
"business house," 1744, according to Barnhart from German Firma "a business, name of a business," originally "signature," from Italian firma "signature," from firmare "to sign," from Latin firmare "make firm, affirm," in Late Latin, "confirm (by signature)," from firmus "strong; stable," figuratively "constant, trusty" (see firm (adj.)).
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dharma (n.)

1796, in secular sense, "caste custom, right behavior;" in Buddhism and Hinduism, "moral law," from Sanskrit, "statute, law; right, justice," etymologically "that which is established firmly," from PIE root *dher- "to hold firmly, support." Compare cognate Latin firmus "strong; stable," figuratively "constant, trusty."

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fidelity (n.)

early 15c., "faithfulness, devotion," from Old French fidélité (15c.), from Latin fidelitatem (nominative fidelitas) "faithfulness, adherence, trustiness," from fidelis "faithful, true, trusty, sincere," from fides "faith" (from PIE root *bheidh- "to trust, confide, persuade"). From 1530s as "faithful adherence to truth or reality;" specifically of sound reproduction from 1878.

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trout (n.)
Old English truht "trout," in part from Old French truite, both from Late Latin tructa, perhaps from Greek troktes "a kind of sea fish," literally "nibbler," from trogein "to gnaw," from PIE *tro-, from root *tere- (1) "to rub, turn." In late 17c. slang, trusty trout was used in a sense of "confidential friend."
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infirm (adj.)

late 14c., "weak, unsound" (of things), from Latin infirmus "weak, frail, feeble, not strong or firm" (figuratively "superstitious, pusillanimous, inconstant"), from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + firmus "strong; stable," figuratively "constant, trusty" (from suffixed form of PIE root *dher- "to hold firmly, support" ). Of persons, "not strong, unhealthy," first recorded c. 1600. As a noun from 1711.

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