Etymology
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trumpet (n.)

late 14c., from Old French trompette "trumpet," diminutive of trompe (see trump (n.2)).

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wood (n.)

Old English wudu, earlier widu "tree, trees collectively, forest, grove; the substance of which trees are made," from Proto-Germanic *widu- (source also of Old Norse viðr, Danish and Swedish ved "tree, wood," Old High German witu "wood"), from PIE *widhu- "tree, wood" (source also of Welsh gwydd "trees," Gaelic fiodh- "wood, timber," Old Irish fid "tree, wood"). Out of the woods "safe" is from 1792.

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wood (adj.)

"violently insane" (now obsolete), from Old English wod "mad, frenzied," from Proto-Germanic *woda- (source also of Gothic woþs "possessed, mad," Old High German wuot "mad, madness," German wut "rage, fury"), from PIE *wet- (1) "to blow; inspire, spiritually arouse;" source of Latin vates "seer, poet," Old Irish faith "poet;" "with a common element of mental excitement" [Buck]. Compare Old English woþ "sound, melody, song," Old Norse oðr "poetry," and the god-name Odin.

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trumpet (v.)

1520s, from trumpet (n.). Figurative sense of "to proclaim, extol" is attested from 1580s. Related: Trumpeted; trumpeting.

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heart-wood (n.)

also heartwood, 1801, from heart (n.) in the sense "central part of a tree" (c. 1400) + wood (n.).

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cord-wood (n.)

"cut wood sold by the cord for fuel," 1630s, from cord in the wood-measure sense + wood (n.).

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match-wood (n.)

also matchwood, 1590s, "wood used to start a fire;" 1838, "wood which has been split to proper size for matches," from match (n.1) + wood (n.). From the latter sense it has been used as a figure of speech for wood which has been broken or splintered into very small pieces. Also in this sense is matchsticks (1791).

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trombone (n.)

brass wind instrument, 1724, from Italian trombone, augmentative form of tromba "trumpet," from a Germanic source (compare Old High German trumba "trumpet;" see trumpet (n.)). German Posaune "trombone" is from Old French buisine, from Latin buccina, bucina "a (crooked) trumpet."

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clarion (n.)

"small, high-pitched trumpet," early 14c., from Old French clarion "(high-pitched) trumpet, bugle" and directly from Medieval Latin clarionem (nominative clario) "a trumpet," from Latin clarus "clear" (see clear (adj.)). Clarion call in the figurative sense "call to battle" is attested from 1838 (clarion's call is from 1807).

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trump (n.2)

"trumpet," c. 1300, from Old French trompe "long, tube-like musical wind instrument" (12c.), cognate with Provençal tromba, Italian tromba, all probably from a Germanic source (compare Old High German trumpa, Old Norse trumba "trumpet"), of imitative origin.

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