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troop (n.)

1540s, "body of soldiers," 1540s, from French troupe, from Old French trope "band of people, company, troop, crowd" (13c.), a word of uncertain origin, perhaps from Frankish *throp "assembly, gathering of people" or another Germanic source, perhaps related to Old English ðorp, Old Norse thorp "village" (see thorp). OED derives the French word from Latin troppus "flock," which is of unknown origin but also might be from the proposed Germanic source. Of groups of animals from 1580s. Specifically as "a subdivision of a cavalry force" from 1580s; of Boy Scouts from 1908. Troops "armed forces" is from 1590s.

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troop (v.)
1560s, "to assemble," from troop (n.). Meaning "to march" is recorded from 1590s; that of "to go in great numbers, to flock" is from c. 1600. Related: Trooped; trooping.
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paratroops (n.)

"body of soldiers who are dropped by parachute into enemy territory," 1940, from parachute + plural of troop (n.).

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troupe (n.)
1825, "company, band," especially of performers, actors, dancers, etc., from French troupe "company" (see troop (n.)).
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trooper (n.)
1630s, "soldier in a cavalry troop," from troop (n.) + -er (1). Extended to "mounted policeman" (1858, in Australia) then to "state policeman" (U.S.) by 1911.
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chetnik (n.)
"member of a Balkan guerrilla force," 1904, from Serbian četnik, from četa "band, troop."
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condottiere (n.)

"professional leader of a mercenary troop," 1794, from Italian condottiere, from condotto "to conduct," from Latin conducere "to lead or bring together" (see conduce).

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Hanse (n.)
also Hansa, medieval merchants' guild, late 12c. in Anglo-Latin, via Old French hanse and Medieval Latin hansa, both from Middle Low German hanse "fellowship, merchants' guild," from Old High German hansa "military troop, band, company." This is related to Gothic hansa "troop, company, multitude," Old English hos "attendants, retinue." A member was a Hansard. Compare Hanseatic.
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school (n.2)

"group of fish," late 14c., scole, from Middle Dutch schole (Dutch school) "group of fish or other animals," cognate with Old English scolu "band, troop, crowd of fish," from West Germanic *skulo- (source also of Old Saxon scola "troop, multitude," West Frisian skoal), perhaps with a literal sense of "division," from PIE root *skel- (1) "to cut." Compare shoal (n.2)). For possible sense development, compare section (n.) from Latin secare "to cut."

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shoal (n.2)
"large number" (especially of fish), 1570s, apparently identical with Old English scolu "band, troop, crowd of fish" (see school (n.2)); but perhaps rather a 16c. adoption of cognate Middle Dutch schole.
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