Etymology
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trigonometric (adj.)
1811; see trigonometry + -ic. Related: Trigonometrical (1660s).
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function (n.)

1530s, "one's proper work or purpose; power of acting in a specific proper way," from French fonction (16c.) and directly from Latin functionem (nominative functio) "a performance, an execution," noun of action from funct-, past-participle stem of fungi "perform, execute, discharge," from PIE *bhung- "be of use, be used" (source also of Sanskrit bhunjate "to benefit, make benefit, atone," Armenian bowcanem "to feed," Old Irish bongaid "to break, harvest"), which is perhaps related to root *bhrug- "to enjoy." Meaning "official ceremony" is from 1630s, originally in church use. Use in mathematics probably was begun by Leibnitz (1692). In reference to computer operations, 1947.

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function (v.)

1844, "perform a function" (intransitive), from function (n.). Related: Functioned; functioning.

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dysfunction (n.)

"failure to function, abnormality or impairment of function," 1914, from dys- "bad, abnormal, difficult" + function (n.). Originally in anatomy and medicine; in sociology by 1949.

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malfunction (n.)

"a faulty functioning, a failure to function as expected," 1827, from mal- "bad, badly, wrong" + function. As a verb, "to fail to function normally or as expected," by 1888. Related: Malfunctioned; malfunctioning.

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functional (adj.)
1630s, "pertaining to function or office," from function (n.) + -al (1), or from Medieval Latin functionalis. Meaning "utilitarian" is by 1864; specific use in architecture is from 1928. Related: Functionally; functionality.
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functionary (n.)
"one who has a certain function, one who holds an office," 1791, from or patterned on French fonctionnaire, a word of the Revolution; from fonction (see function (n.)). As an adjective in English from 1822, "functional." Related: Functionarism.
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prepositional (adj.)

"pertaining to or having the nature or function of a preposition," 1754, from preposition + -al (1). Related: Prepositionally.

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procreative (adj.)

"having the power or function of begetting," 1630s; see procreate + -ive. Related: Procreativeness.

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