Advertisement
87 entries found
Search filter: All Results 
joy (n.)

c. 1200, "feeling of pleasure and delight;" c. 1300, "source of pleasure or happiness," from Old French joie "pleasure, delight, erotic pleasure, bliss, joyfulness" (11c.), from Latin gaudia "expressions of pleasure; sensual delight," plural of gaudium "joy, inward joy, gladness, delight; source of pleasure or delight," from gaudere "rejoice," from PIE root *gau- "to rejoice" (cognates: Greek gaio "I rejoice," Middle Irish guaire "noble").

As a term of endearment from 1580s. Joy-riding is American English, 1908; joy-ride (n.) is from 1909.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
joy-stick (n.)

also joystick, 1910, aviators' slang for the control lever of an airplane, from joy + stick (n.). Transferred sense of "small lever to control movement" is from 1952; later especially in reference to controlling images on a screen (1978). As slang for "dildo," probably from early 1930s.

Related entries & more 
traveler (n.)
also traveller, late 14c., agent noun from travel (v.). Traveler's check is from 1891.
Related entries & more 
gratulation (n.)

late 15c., gratulacyon "expression of thanks," from Latin gratulationem (nominative gratulatio) "a manifestation of joy, wishing joy, rejoicing," from past-participle stem of gratulari "give thanks, show joy," from gratus "agreeable" (from suffixed form of PIE root *gwere- (2) "to favor").

Related entries & more 
credit-card (n.)
1952 in the modern sense; see credit (n.) + card (n.1). The phrase was used late 19c. to mean "traveler's check."
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
jubilation (n.)

late 14c., from Old French jubilacion "jubilation, rejoicing," and directly from Late Latin iubilationem (nominative iubilatio) "a shouting for joy," noun of action from past-participle stem of iubilare "to let out whoops, shout for joy" (see jubilant).

Related entries & more 
acclaim (n.)
"act of acclaiming, a shout of joy," 1667 (in Milton), from acclaim (v.).
Related entries & more 
joie de vivre (n.)
1889, French, literally "joy of living."
Related entries & more 
feu de joie (n.)
public bonfire, French, literally "fire of joy."
Related entries & more 
falafel (n.)

also felafel, popular Middle-Eastern food, by 1951 as a traveler's word, not common or domestic in English until 1970s; from Arabic falafil, said to mean "crunchy."

Related entries & more