Etymology
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transportation (n.)
1530s, "act of transporting," noun of action from transport (v.). Middle English used verbal noun transporting (early 15c.). In the sense of "means of conveyance" it is first recorded 1853.
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company (n.)

mid-12c., "large group of people," from Old French compagnie "society, friendship, intimacy; body of soldiers" (12c.), from Late Latin companio, literally "bread fellow, messmate," from Latin com "with, together" (see com-) + panis "bread," from PIE root *pa- "to feed." Abbreviation co. dates from 1670s. 

Meaning "companionship, consort of persons one with another, intimate association" is from late 13c. Meaning "person or persons associated with another in any way" is from c. 1300. In Middle English the word also could mean "sexual union, intercourse" (c. 1300).

From late 14c. as "a number of persons united to perform or carry out anything jointly," which developed a commercial sense of "business association" by 1550s, the word having been used in reference to trade guilds from late 14c. Meaning "subdivision of an infantry regiment" (in 19c. usually 60 to 100 men, commanded by a captain) is from c. 1400. 

Meaning "person or persons with whom one voluntarily associates" is from c. 1600; phrase keep company "consort" is from 1560s (bear company in the same sense is from c. 1300). Expression two's company "two persons are just right" (for conversation, etc.), is attested from 1849; the following line varies: but three is none (or not), 1849; three's trumpery (1864); three's a crowd (1856). 

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maglev 

system of rail transportation using two sets of magnets, 1973, a contraction of magnetic levitation.

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airline (n.)
also air-line, 1813, "beeline, straight line between two points on the earth's surface" (as through the air, rather than over terrain), from air (n.1) + line (n.). From 1853 and in later 19c. especially in reference to railways that ran directly between big cities in the U.S. instead of meandering from town to town in search of stock subscriptions as early railways typically did. Meaning "public aircraft transportation company" is from 1914.
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merchantman (n.)

"a ship employed in the transportation of goods," 1620s, from merchant + man.

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packer (n.)

mid-14c., pakker (mid-13c. as a surname), "one who packs goods in bundles for transportation," agent noun from pack (v.). As "a machine used for packing," by 1890. The Wisconsin U.S. football team was named at its founding in 1919 for the Indian Packing Company (a meat-canning operation where one of the founders worked as a shipping clerk), which gave the team organizers $500 for uniforms and equipment and let it use the company's field on condition that the team be named for its sponsor.

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ridership (n.)

mid-15c., "office of a mounted forest ranger," from rider + -ship. From 1962 as "number of passengers" (using a form of public transportation, etc.).

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troupe (n.)
1825, "company, band," especially of performers, actors, dancers, etc., from French troupe "company" (see troop (n.)).
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transport (n.)
mid-15c., originally "mental exaltation;" sense of "means of transportation, carriage, conveyance" is recorded from 1690s; from transport (v.).
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Lacoste 
Paris-based high-end apparel company, founded 1933, named for company co-founder René Lacoste (1904-1996).
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