Advertisement
19 entries found
Search filter: All Results 
transmit (v.)
c. 1400, from Latin transmittere "send across, cause to go across, transfer, pass on," from trans "across, beyond" (see trans-) + mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission). Related: Transmitted; transmitting.
Related entries & more 
Advertisement
transmissible (adj.)
1640s, from Latin transmiss-, stem of transmittere "send across, carry over" (see transmit) + -ible. Related: Transmissibility.
Related entries & more 
retransmit (v.)

"transmit further on or back again," 1868, from re- "back, again" + transmit (v.). Related: Retransmitted; retransmitting.

Related entries & more 
Advertisement
transmitter (n.)
1727, "one who transmits," agent noun from transmit. In telegraphy from 1844. Meaning "apparatus for transmitting radio signals" is from 1934.
Related entries & more 
transmission (n.)

1610s, "conveyance from one place to another," from Latin transmissionem (nominative transmissio) "a sending over or across, passage," noun of action from past-participle stem of transmittere "send over or across" (see transmit). Meaning "part of a motor vehicle that regulates power from the engine to the axle" is first recorded 1894.

Related entries & more 
communicate (v.)

1520s, "to impart (information, etc.); to give or transmit (a quality, feeling, etc.) to another," from Latin communicatus, past participle of communicare "to share, communicate, impart, inform," literally "to make common," related to communis "common, public, general" (see common (adj.)). Meaning "to share, transmit" (diseases, etc.) is from 1530s. Intransitive sense, of rooms, etc., "to open into each other" is from 1731. Related: Communicated; communicating.

Related entries & more 
radio (v.)

"transmit by radio," 1916, from radio (n.). Related: Radioed; radioing. An earlier verb in the same sense was marconi (1908), from the name of Italian inventor Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937), pioneer of wireless telegraphy.

Related entries & more 
trolley (n.)
1823, in Suffolk dialect, "a cart," especially one with wheels flanged for running on a track (1858), probably from troll (v.) in the sense of "to roll." Sense transferred to "device used to transmit electric current to streetcars, consisting of a trolley wheel which makes contact with the overhead wires" (1888), then "streetcar drawing power by a trolley" (1891), which probably is short for trolley-car, attested from 1889.
Related entries & more