Etymology
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trademark (n.)

also trade-mark, 1838 (the thing itself attested continuously from 14c., apparently originally the watermarks on paper), from trade (n.) + mark (n.1) in a specialized sense of "stamp, seal, brand, etc. placed upon an article top indicate ownership or origin" (mid-13c.). Figurative use by 1869. As a verb, from 1904. Related: Trademarked; trademarking. This sense of mark also yielded the meaning "particular brand or make of an article" (1660s), hence its use in 20c. names of cars, etc., Mark I, Mark II, etc.

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Big Mac 
trademark name (McDonald's Corp.) of a type of large hamburger sandwich; by 1968.
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Demerol 
trademark name, by 1942; originally a morphine substitute.
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Saran 
U.S. trademark name for PVC used as a cling-film, 1940, by Dow Chemical Company.
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BVDs (n.)
"men's underwear," 1935, from trademark name (dating to 1876) of manufacturer Bradley, Voorhees, and Day.
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Uzi 
1959, trademark name for Israeli-made submachine gun, developed by Usiel Gal (1923–2002), and manufactured by IMI.
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deep-freeze (n.)
registered trademark (U.S. Patent Office, 1941) of a type of refrigerator; used generically for "cold storage" since 1949.
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Styrofoam (n.)
1950, trademark name (Dow Chemical Co.), from -styr- (from polystyrene) + connective -o- + foam (n.).
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Dubonnet (n.)

sweet French aperitif, by 1901, trademark name, from the name of a family of French wine merchants.

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Speedo 
trademark name of a brand of swimwear, 1928, originally made by McRae Hosiery Manufacturers, Australia. From speed.
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