Etymology
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total (adj.)
late 14c., from Old French total (14c.), from Medieval Latin totalis "entire, total" (as in summa totalis "sum total"), from Latin totus "all, all at once, the whole, entire, altogether," a word of unknown origin. Total war is attested from 1937 (William Shirer), in reference to a concept developed in Germany.
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total (n.)
"whole amount, sum," 1550s, from total (adj.).
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total (v.)
1716, "bring to a total," from total (n.). Intransitive sense "reach a total of" is from 1859. Meaning "to destroy one's car" first recorded 1954. Related: Totaled; totaling.
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subtotal (n.)
1906, from sub- + total (n.). The verb is attested from 1916.
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toto 
Latin ablative singular (masc. and neuter) of totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)).
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tot (v.)
"to reckon up," 1760, from tot (n.) "total of an addition," first recorded 1680s, short for total (n.). Hence, "to mark (an account or a name) with the word 'tot.'"
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totality (n.)

1590s, from total (adj.) + -ity, or from or based on French totalité, Medieval Latin totalitas. In the eclipse sense, "time of total obscuration," from 1842.

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in toto (adv.)
Latin, "as a whole, wholly, completely, utterly, entirely," from toto, ablative of totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)); "always or nearly always with verbs of negative sense" [Fowler].
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in totidem verbis 
Latin phrase, "in just so many words," that is, "in these very words," from demonstrative of Latin totus "whole, entire" (see total (adj.)) + ablative plural of verbum "word" (see verb).
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