Etymology
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formerly (adv.)

"in times past," 1580s, from former (adj.) + -ly (2). A Middle English word for this was andersith "formerly, at former times" (early 14c.).

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old-time (adj.)

"of long standing; having the characteristics of former times," 1824, from old + time (n.). Related: Old-timey (1850). Old times "olden days" is from late 14c. Colloquial old-timer "one who has long occupied a given place or condition; one who retains the views and customs of former times" is by 1860.

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antiquity (n.)

late 14c., "olden times," from Old French antiquitet (11c.; Modern French antiquité) "olden times; great age; old age," from Latin antiquitatem (nominative antiquitas) "ancient times, antiquity, venerableness," noun of quality from stem of antiquus "ancient, of olden times; long in existence" (see antique (adj.)). The specific reference to ancient Greece and Rome is from mid-15c.; the meaning "quality of being old" is from about the same time. Antiquities "relics of ancient days" is from 1510s.

To be ignorant of all antiquity is a mutilation of the human mind [I. Disraeli, "Amenities of Literature"]
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Gadarene swine (n.)

an image from Matthew viii.28. From Gadara, town of ancient times near Galilee.

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beforetime (adv.)

"in former times," c. 1300, from before + time (n.). Related: Beforetimes.

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millionfold 

"a million times as much or many," 1721, from million + -fold.

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ninefold (adj., adv.)

"nine times repeated, nine times as great or numerous; consisting of nine parts," 1550s; see nine + -fold. Possibly a 16c. formation; the word is not attested in Middle English, but late Old English had nigonfeald.

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sevenfold (adj.)

"having seven aspects or facets, folds or thicknesses; repeated or multiplied seven times;" Old English seofonfeald; see seven + -fold. Also as an adverb, "seven times as much or often; in seven ways."

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laudator temporis acti 

Latin phrase used of one who looks to the past as better times, 1736, from Horace's laudator temporis acti se puero "a praiser of times past when he was a boy" [Ars Poetica, 173], from laudator, agent noun of laudare "to praise" (see laud).

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quadricentennial 

"pertaining to or consisting of a period of 400 years," as a noun, "commemoration or celebration of an event which occurred 400 years ago," also quadri-centennial, 1859, from quadri- + centennial. Alternative quater-centennial (1868, meaning "four times a year") is from Latin quater "four times" (compare quaternary).

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