Etymology
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thrown 
past participle of throw (v.).
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hand-grenade (n.)
"bomb thrown by hand," 1660s, from hand (n.) + grenade.
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missile (n.)

"thing thrown or discharged as a weapon for the purpose of hitting something," 1650s, from missile (adj.), 1610s, "capable of being thrown," chiefly in phrase missile weapon, from French missile and directly from Latin missilis "that may be thrown or hurled" (also, in plural, as a noun, "weapons that can be thrown, darts, javelins"), from missus "a throwing, hurling," past participle of mittere "to release, let go; send, throw" (see mission). Sense of "self-propelled rocket or bomb" is first recorded 1738; in reference to modern rocket-propelled, remote-guidance projectiles by 1945.

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unhinged (adj.)
"thrown into confusion," 1719, past-participle adjective from unhinge.
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eject (v.)
mid-15c., from Latin eiectus "thrown out," past participle of eicere "throw out, cast out, thrust out; drive into exile, expel, drive away," from ex "out" (see ex-) + -icere, combining form of iacere "to throw" (from PIE root *ye- "to throw, impel"). Related: Ejected; ejecting. Ejecta "matter thrown out by a volcano" is from 1851.
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disgruntled (adj.)

"thrown into a state of sulky dissatisfaction," 1680s, past-participle adjective from disgruntle.

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intercept (n.)
"that which is intercepted," from intercept (v.). From 1821 of a ball thrown in a sport; 1880 in navigation; 1942 in reference to secret messages.
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cropper (n.)

"a fall, as in horseback riding, in which the rider is thrown over the horse's head," hence "a failure," 1858, perhaps from crop (n.) in the "top of the head" sense.

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breastwork (n.)
"fieldwork thrown up breast-high for defense," 1640s, from breast (n.) + work (n.) in "fortification" sense. Old English had breostweall in same sense.
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cribbage (n.)

card game for two or four, 1620s, probably from crib "set of cards thrown from each player's hand" (which is of uncertain origin), though this word is later than the game name.

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